Stop Smoking Support Groups Flagstaff AZ

Smoking even a single cigarette can make the heart "stiffen" and not relax normally between contractions, researchers say. The Arizona Daily Star reported May 16 that a cardiac imaging study at the University of Arizona reveals that any amount of smoking can be dangerous. Read and find out more.

Guidance Center Inc
(928) 527-1899
2187 North Vickey Street
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Northern Arizona
(928) 773-9376
2101 North 4th Street
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Gary Glenn NCC, CCMHC
(520) 779-5840 
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Suzanne Andry Botello, NCC
(928) 226-4316 
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Schidler, Kelli
(480) 620-5464
7500 E Pinnacle Peak Rd #A-104
Scottsdale, AZ

Data Provided by:
Community Medical Services LLC
(928) 714-0010
2559 East 7th Avenue
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
McDonald, Craydon
(928) 774-1100
1100 N. San Francisco Street Suite C
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Flagstaff Medical Center
(928) 213-6400x16400
1200 North Beaver Street
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Lusk, Della
BLDG 2-2
710 N. Beaver Street BLDG 2-2
Flagstaff, AZ

Data Provided by:
Haven
(520) 623-4590
1107 East Adelaide Drive
Tucson, AZ

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

A Single Cigarette Causes Heart Dysfunction

Provided By: 

Single Cigarette Causes Heart Dysfunction

JoinTogether.org

Wednesday, May 17, 2006

Smoking even a single cigarette can make the heart "stiffen" and not relax normally between contractions, researchers say.

The Arizona Daily Star reported May 16 that a cardiac imaging study at the University of Arizona reveals that any amount of smoking can be dangerous. "What we found is that with just one puff of a cigarette, we see changes in the way the heart relaxes between contractions. It seems to stiffen -- it does not have the vigorous motion it should have," said researcher Vincent Sorrell of the University of Arizona. "And we know that failure to relax properly is an early marker for heart failure."

Karen Martin, manager of Tucson's antismoking program, said she will use the information in her prevention messages. "This dramatically demonstrates how you damage over and over again the vital organs that keep the whole body going," she said. "Our cessation people enjoy passing along the latest information on what smoking does to you. The smokers always say, 'Yeah, yeah, we've heard it all,' but this is new evidence they need to hear."

Researchers decided to conduct the imaging tests after noticing that smokers often complain of shortness of breath, but have normal test results in the doctor's office. "I thought maybe there is something going on transiently while they are smoking, but later, at the doctor's office ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Addicted.com