Addiction Treatment Center Rock Hill SC

An addict may become an addict by first having a physical injury of some sort. The doctor prescribes pain medication, and before long the addict is hooked. Aside from the pain-killing effects of the drug on the physical body, the addict also recieves an emotional/mental relief, which contributes to the addiction.

Keystone Substance Abuse Services
199 South Herlong Avenue,
Rock Hill, SC29732
(803) 324-1800
www.keystoneyork.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(803) 324-0404x404

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification

Residency: Hospital inpatient, Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Men, DUI/DWI offenders

Keystone was established in 1969 as a private, not-for-profit organization that serves as the Act 301 (1973) substance abuse authority in York County, South Carolina. Keystone offers nationally accredited and licensed services – including education, prevention and treatment (both outpatient and inpatient) -- to meet the needs of individuals, families, and groups in York County and surrounding areas experiencing alcohol and/or drug related problems.
Keystone Substance Abuse Services is the county's largest provider of treatment and prevention services. Keystone is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and adheres to the definition of addictive disease as developed by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and the standards for service placement. Keystone is a charter member of Behavioral Health Services Association of South Carolina. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services annually inspect Keystone.
OUR MISSION
Promoting health, offering hope, and restoring healing to those impacted by substance abuse and addiction.
OUR VISION
Keystone envisions a society where substance abuse is recognized as a complex public health issue that can be positively impacted through prevention, intervention, and treatment. In establishing a recovery oriented system of care we strive to:
Expand partnerships with the medical community;
Increase service accessibility and demographic reach;
Generate economic development;
Decrease costs of both healthcare and criminal justice;
Promote educational success; and Improve the quality of life of individuals, families and community.
OUR CORE VALUES
We treat all members of the Keystone community with sensitivity and dignity.
We seek to balance passion, well being, and excellence.
We value personal choice and privacy in care.

Addiction Begins with Pain

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Addiction Begins with Pain

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Friday, September 14, 2007 Addiction begins with pain, sometimes physical, other times mental or emotional.

Almost all use or abuse of alcohol or drugs is related to escapism- a need to deaden feelings of hurt, sorrow, loss or pain.

An addict may become an addict by first having a physical injury of some sort. The doctor prescribes pain medication, and before long the addict is hooked. Aside from the pain-killing effects of the drug on the physical body, the addict also recieves an emotional/mental relief, which contributes to the addiction.

A person who uses illegal, or street drugs, most often is searching for an escape. Many psychiatrists and therapists now refer to illegal drug use, or alcohol abuse as "self-medicating".

People are searching for a way to feel better, to forget something, or to just escape the difficulties of their lives. The use of drugs may be only a temporary fix, but to an addict, any relief is better than none at all.

In order to really help an addicted person there must be some way to address the underlying source of the self-medicating. Like a medical doctor, the therapist must attempt to find out "what hurts" and why it hurts, before the addiction can be addressed. Likewise the patient must be willing to face the pain of the injury, and experience their sense of loss, grief or sadness, rather than trying again and again to supress it or escape from it.

Recovery from addiction is not about self-control or will power. When an addict begins to use substances they never believe that they can become "addicts." It is the old "It couldn't happen to me" trick, that gets them to start using the drug. Promises of how the drugs "will make you feel good" or "make you feel better" and even "make you feel no pain" are an easy lure for people who feel bad, or are dealing with an intense emotional pain. If the drug actually does help "take a...

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