Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers Duluth MN

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. Read for more.

Thunderbird/Wren House
229 North 4th Avenue West,
Duluth, MN55806
(218) 727-7699
www.mashkawisen.com

Intake Phone Numbers:
(218) 722-2703

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Adult Inpatient Treatment Program
The Mash-ka-wisen Treatment Center provides inpatient treatment services to Native Americans who are suffering from alcohol and/or drug abuse addictions. The program takes an eclectic approach to meeting the client’s needs to maintain sobriety. Clients are given opportunities to learn about their addiction and the recovery process. Clients are also invited to explore Native American Culture and Tradition through the use of traditional practices and ceremonies. Other services that are available for clients are nursing and psychological services as needed.
The program is typically a thirty day program. An extended program is available for those clients who need more time to address their addiction. Mash-ka-wisen is dedicated to assisting our clients in entering a life of recovery. We take our responsibilities very seriously and our staff is dedicated to providing the best available services to support clients in developing a life of recovery.
Adolescent Inpatient Treatment Program
The adolescent program provides treatment services for Native American youth ages 13-17 years old. The program is a minimum of 45 days and focuses on educating the client on the harmful consequences of their chemical use, the addiction process, recovery, life skills and taking pride in being an Indian person. Our program also provides four hours of school five days a week while the client is in treatment. Clients are also asked to develop a re-entry plan before their graduation from treatment.
Minnesota Teen Challenge
1 East First Street, Suite 100,
Duluth, MN55802
(218) 740-5544
www.mntc.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days), Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women

For more than 25 years, Mn Adult & Teen Challenge has been restoring hope to teens and adults struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. We offer a full range of services including:
Intensive licensed Rule 31 treatment programs: both residential and outpatient
Long-term faith-based recovery programs
Extensive aftercare programs for graduates
Prevention programs for middle and high school students
These offerings allow us to effectively serve individuals with a broad spectrum of addiction issues; from those seeking treatment for the first time, to those who have been struggling with addiction for many years.
Haven in Cloquet
1003 Cloquet Avenue, Suite 117,
Cloquet, MN55720
(218) 879-5545
www.havenchemicalhealth.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Haven Chemical Health Systems opened its doors in 2000 with one outpatient facility, The Haven in Woodbury. Not long after, two additional facilities, The Haven in Shakopee and Margaret’s House, a ten-bed Residential facility for women located in Mendota Heights, were opened. These was followed shortly by the opening of The Haven in Waconia, as well as The Haven in Cloquet. In 2004, Rebecca’s Residence in Scandia was opened which, similar to Margaret’s House, is a ten-bed women’s Residential Facility. Our newest location, Paul's Place (opened December 2008) is our first Men's Residential facility that currently has six beds and is located in Farmington.
Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Marty Mann House
714 North 11th Avenue East,
Duluth, MN55805
(218) 723-8444
www.cadt.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Persons with HIV/AIDS, Gays and Lesbians, Seniors/older adults, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Criminal justice clients

The Center for Alcohol & Drug Treatment is a non-profit community agency founded in 1961. Our main office is located in Duluth, Minnesota. Our primary service area is Northeastern Minnesota, but our residential facilities may accept clients from anywhere in the U.S.
Our main purpose is to provide chemical health, substance abuse, addiction treatment & recovery services. We offer a flexible array of programs and services designed around the changing needs of our clients and the community - from DWI programs and medically assisted recovery, to intensive residential & outpatient treatment, medium intensity residential programs and aftercare.
The Center recognizes that there are many paths to recovery from substance abuse and addiction. Our programs support both 12 Step and alternative approaches to recovery. There is no "one-size-fits-all" treatment at the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment.
Finally, the Center does not discriminate in our hiring of staff or our treatment of clients. We welcome clients of any sex, race, age, religious affiliation, or sexual orientation.
Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
1402 East Superior Street,
Duluth, MN55805
(218) 723-8444
www.cadt.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

The Center for Alcohol & Drug Treatment is a non-profit community agency founded in 1961. Our main office is located in Duluth, Minnesota. Our primary service area is Northeastern Minnesota, but our residential facilities may accept clients from anywhere in the U.S.
Our main purpose is to provide chemical health, substance abuse, addiction treatment & recovery services. We offer a flexible array of programs and services designed around the changing needs of our clients and the community - from DWI programs and medically assisted recovery, to intensive residential & outpatient treatment, medium intensity residential programs and aftercare.
The Center recognizes that there are many paths to recovery from substance abuse and addiction. Our programs support both 12 Step and alternative approaches to recovery. There is no "one-size-fits-all" treatment at the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment.
Finally, the Center does not discriminate in our hiring of staff or our treatment of clients. We welcome clients of any sex, race, age, religious affiliation, or sexual orientation.
Bethel Port Rehabilitation Center
23 Mesaba Avenue,
Duluth, MN55806
(218) 727-7415
www.duluthbethel.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(218) 727-7415x110, (218) 727-0504x150

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Specializing in Men

The Duluth Bethel is one of the oldest human services agencies in Northeastern Minnesota. It was founded in 1873 when the Western Seamen's Friend Society in Cleveland opened a branch in Duluth. It was organized as a nonprofit corporation on September 6 of the same year. The Bethel was established to "promote temporal and spiritual welfare of seamen and their families and of such as may not have been provided for by regular religious and benevolent societies in the city and vicinity." In the early years it served seamen, miners, lumberjacks, and their families who settled in the frontier port of Duluth.

The port of Duluth in the late nineteenth century was a place where work and good times could be found. But it also was a place where dreams could be shattered and fortunes lost. The Bethel provided food, shelter, and a helping hand when workers and their families fell on hard times.
Bethel Outpatient Services
23 Mesaba Avenue,
Duluth, MN55806
(218) 727-0504x151
www.duluthbethel.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(218) 727-0504

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Specializing in Women, Men, DUI/DWI offenders

The Duluth Bethel is one of the oldest human services agencies in Northeastern Minnesota. It was founded in 1873 when the Western Seamen's Friend Society in Cleveland opened a branch in Duluth. It was organized as a nonprofit corporation on September 6 of the same year. The Bethel was established to "promote temporal and spiritual welfare of seamen and their families and of such as may not have been provided for by regular religious and benevolent societies in the city and vicinity." In the early years it served seamen, miners, lumberjacks, and their families who settled in the frontier port of Duluth.
The port of Duluth in the late nineteenth century was a place where work and good times could be found. But it also was a place where dreams could be shattered and fortunes lost. The Bethel provided food, shelter, and a helping hand when workers and their families fell on hard times.

Addiction and Intervention

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Addiction and Intervention

Ben Seymour - 9/10/2007

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. In the beginning of the process they often report feelings of anger, hurt and betrayal. Many expect the intervention process to be one of consequences and punishment. However, this is not the case. Intervention is a process of love and education. Once the group is properly educated about the disease and sees that medical evidence has been discovered, the anger dissipates and a visible sense of compassion and understanding takes over. It is my belief that once the family, friends and co-workers are properly educated about addiction, any intervention is a successful one.

Addiction in the Media

Every time I turn on the TV I hear about which celebrity got a DUI or checked into rehab today. Yet the latest medical findings and addiction research rarely get any exposure. The American Medical Association (AMA) announced that they viewed alcoholism as a disease in 1956. In 1987 they included drug addiction to this category. So why in 2007, 20 years later, are we still debating whether addiction is a disease? What happened? The latest research proves that addiction is a disease of the brain which can be active prior to any substances being introduced to the body. Scientists have discovered specific differences in the genetic make-up of children born to alcoholic and addicted people. We have brain scans which visibly show the phenomena of craving in the brains of addicts when they are not using. The evidence is astounding and clearly points to the conclusion of addiction being a disease.

The fact is that many diseases are linked with unhealthy behavior. Clogged arteries, heart disease and acquired diabetes are usually the results of eating certain foods, lack of exercise and/or other unhealthy choices, yet no one goes to jail for eating potato chips. It is time for America to face the evidence that well over 80% of our prison populations are made up of untreated addicts. Treatment not only saves tax dollars, it saves lives.

The Role of Intervention

As I mentioned before, addiction and intervention are both hot topics in the media today. However, the majority of Americans still don’t understand what addiction and intervention really are. Many people believe that intervention is the ultimate showdown between the addict and the family. Families and spouses begin to adopt a punitive attitude about "making" the addict stop. They believe if they just threaten and punish the addict enough he or she will somehow "straighten up." Addiction Medicine shows us otherwise. Brain scans...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Addicted.com