Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers Laconia NH

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. Read for more.

Lakes Region General Hospital
Nathan Brody Chemical Dependency Prog
73 Daniel Webster Highway,
Belmont, NH3220
(603) 527-2908
www.lrgh.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(603) 527-2980

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders

Nestled in the beautiful Lakes and Three Rivers Regions of New Hampshire, LRGHealthcare is a not-for-profit healthcare charitable trust representing Lakes Region General Hospital (LRGH), Franklin Regional Hospital (FRH), 22 affiliated medical providers and service programs.
Our mission is to provide quality, compassionate care and to strengthen the well-being of our community. We are driven by healthcare needs of the communities we serve, and very proud of our long tradition of providing quality healthcare services to the Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.
About LRGHealthcareLRGH is a community and regional acute care facility with a licensed bed capacity of 137 beds, and FRH is a 25-bed critical access community hospital. In 2000, FRH and LRGH merged together and added the trade name LRGHealthcare. Committed to increasing our capacity for patients, adding more depth in staffing, and more options for patients, we knew that joining our hospitals would provide stability to both organizations, ultimately benefiting the communities we serve.
The Lakes Region communities we serve include, Laconia, Gilford, Alton, Ashland, Barnstead, Belmont, Center Harbor, Gilmanton, Meredith, Moultonborough, New Hampton and Sandwich. In the Three Rivers Region, we serve the communities of Franklin, Tilton, Northfield, Sanbornton, Alexandria, Andover, Bristol, Bridgewater, Boscawen, Danbury, Hebron, Hill and Salisbury.
We offer a wide range of medical, surgical, specialty, diagnostic, and therapeutic services, wellness education, support groups, and other community outreach services. Our Emergency Services department is staffed with specially trained physicians, nurses and staff, providing the highest quality care, delivered with the care and compassion. 24-hour availability of state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, and both ground and air transfer capability to tertiary care facilities. More than 200 active staff physicians and providers are in our network.
Together, LRGH, FRH, and all of our affiliated programs and services provide comprehensive healthcare to the entire Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.

Addiction and Intervention

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Addiction and Intervention

Ben Seymour - 9/10/2007

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. In the beginning of the process they often report feelings of anger, hurt and betrayal. Many expect the intervention process to be one of consequences and punishment. However, this is not the case. Intervention is a process of love and education. Once the group is properly educated about the disease and sees that medical evidence has been discovered, the anger dissipates and a visible sense of compassion and understanding takes over. It is my belief that once the family, friends and co-workers are properly educated about addiction, any intervention is a successful one.

Addiction in the Media

Every time I turn on the TV I hear about which celebrity got a DUI or checked into rehab today. Yet the latest medical findings and addiction research rarely get any exposure. The American Medical Association (AMA) announced that they viewed alcoholism as a disease in 1956. In 1987 they included drug addiction to this category. So why in 2007, 20 years later, are we still debating whether addiction is a disease? What happened? The latest research proves that addiction is a disease of the brain which can be active prior to any substances being introduced to the body. Scientists have discovered specific differences in the genetic make-up of children born to alcoholic and addicted people. We have brain scans which visibly show the phenomena of craving in the brains of addicts when they are not using. The evidence is astounding and clearly points to the conclusion of addiction being a disease.

The fact is that many diseases are linked with unhealthy behavior. Clogged arteries, heart disease and acquired diabetes are usually the results of eating certain foods, lack of exercise and/or other unhealthy choices, yet no one goes to jail for eating potato chips. It is time for America to face the evidence that well over 80% of our prison populations are made up of untreated addicts. Treatment not only saves tax dollars, it saves lives.

The Role of Intervention

As I mentioned before, addiction and intervention are both hot topics in the media today. However, the majority of Americans still don’t understand what addiction and intervention really are. Many people believe that intervention is the ultimate showdown between the addict and the family. Families and spouses begin to adopt a punitive attitude about "making" the addict stop. They believe if they just threaten and punish the addict enough he or she will somehow "straighten up." Addiction Medicine shows us otherwise. Brain scans...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Addicted.com