Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers Morgantown WV

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. Read for more.

Valley Healthcare System
New Beginnings Program for Women
202 Columbia Street,
Fairmont, WV26554
(304) 296-2228
www.valleyhealthcare.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(304) 363-2228, (304) 296-1731

Hotline Phone Numbers: (800) 232-0020

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Women

Founded in 1969 by West Virginia University, Valley Counseling Services united with The Human Resources Association and incorporated as Valley Community Mental Health Services in 1972. Doing business as Valley HealthCare System, a nonprofit corporation, Valley has grown from a small counseling center located in the basement of a University building to a large multi-county, comprehensive behavioral health program.

Spurred by the federal government, funds became available through the passage of the Community Mental Health Center Act of 1963, introduced by President John F. Kennedy and Valley was able to establish itself as one of 13 federally-funded mental health centers in the state in the early 1970’s.

Over the years, Valley has continued to add to its array of services for people with disabilities, including services for individuals with developmental disabilities, mental health and chemical dependency issues.

We believe that the work that we do in Monongalia, Marion, Preston and Taylor Counties enhances the quality of life, not just for the persons served, but for everyone in those counties as well.
Valley Healthcare System
ACT Unit
100 Crosswind Drive,
Fairmont, WV26554
(304) 296-2228
www.valleyhealthcare.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(304) 363-2228, (304) 296-1731

Hotline Phone Numbers: (800) 232-0020

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Founded in 1969 by West Virginia University, Valley Counseling Services united with The Human Resources Association and incorporated as Valley Community Mental Health Services in 1972. Doing business as Valley HealthCare System, a nonprofit corporation, Valley has grown from a small counseling center located in the basement of a University building to a large multi-county, comprehensive behavioral health program.
Spurred by the federal government, funds became available through the passage of the Community Mental Health Center Act of 1963, introduced by President John F. Kennedy and Valley was able to establish itself as one of 13 federally-funded mental health centers in the state in the early 1970’s.
Over the years, Valley has continued to add to its array of services for people with disabilities, including services for individuals with developmental disabilities, mental health and chemical dependency issues.
We believe that the work that we do in Monongalia, Marion, Preston and Taylor Counties enhances the quality of life, not just for the persons served, but for everyone in those counties as well.
Fayette County
Drug and Alcohol Commission Inc
100 New Salem Road, Suite 106,
Uniontown, PA15401
(724) 438-3576x124
www.fcdaa.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(724) 438-3576x120, (724) 438-3576x138

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Private health insurance

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Men, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

Vision Statement:

It is the vision of FCDAC, Inc. to strive for addiction free living by making available within our community a well-trained professional staff who will provide the education, awareness and encouragement to empower individuals to make positive choices for total wellness.

Mission Statement:

Enhancing our community's quality of life by promoting addiction free living.

Diversity Statement:

Diversity refers to the various ethnic, cultural and demographic differences that exist among employees in our workforce. Diversity includes personal characteristics such as age, race, color, gender and disability as well as differences in backgrounds, values and beliefs. FCDAC, Inc. recognizes the importance of cultural diversity in the workplace, and is committed to enhancing our diversity and to demonstrating its commitment to our clients.

Addiction and Intervention

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Addiction and Intervention

Ben Seymour - 9/10/2007

As an interventionist and addiction therapist, one of the most common misconceptions I run across is the idea that somehow, addiction is a moral failing or learned behavior. In fact, some doctors, social workers and even counselors are still misinformed about the true causality of addiction. Many of the families that I encounter when performing the intervention process have been taught or still subscribe to this belief. In the beginning of the process they often report feelings of anger, hurt and betrayal. Many expect the intervention process to be one of consequences and punishment. However, this is not the case. Intervention is a process of love and education. Once the group is properly educated about the disease and sees that medical evidence has been discovered, the anger dissipates and a visible sense of compassion and understanding takes over. It is my belief that once the family, friends and co-workers are properly educated about addiction, any intervention is a successful one.

Addiction in the Media

Every time I turn on the TV I hear about which celebrity got a DUI or checked into rehab today. Yet the latest medical findings and addiction research rarely get any exposure. The American Medical Association (AMA) announced that they viewed alcoholism as a disease in 1956. In 1987 they included drug addiction to this category. So why in 2007, 20 years later, are we still debating whether addiction is a disease? What happened? The latest research proves that addiction is a disease of the brain which can be active prior to any substances being introduced to the body. Scientists have discovered specific differences in the genetic make-up of children born to alcoholic and addicted people. We have brain scans which visibly show the phenomena of craving in the brains of addicts when they are not using. The evidence is astounding and clearly points to the conclusion of addiction being a disease.

The fact is that many diseases are linked with unhealthy behavior. Clogged arteries, heart disease and acquired diabetes are usually the results of eating certain foods, lack of exercise and/or other unhealthy choices, yet no one goes to jail for eating potato chips. It is time for America to face the evidence that well over 80% of our prison populations are made up of untreated addicts. Treatment not only saves tax dollars, it saves lives.

The Role of Intervention

As I mentioned before, addiction and intervention are both hot topics in the media today. However, the majority of Americans still don’t understand what addiction and intervention really are. Many people believe that intervention is the ultimate showdown between the addict and the family. Families and spouses begin to adopt a punitive attitude about "making" the addict stop. They believe if they just threaten and punish the addict enough he or she will somehow "straighten up." Addiction Medicine shows us otherwise. Brain scans...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Addicted.com