Alcohol Abuse Treatment Waterville ME

If a person starts regularly drinking in excess, the brain cells' dendrites must grow more receptor cites to take up the amount of alcohol present. Growth of more receptors is called "up-regulation". With extra receptors now existing, these receptors will react if there is insufficient alcohol to be taken up. This is called "withdrawal", and it makes a person ill until they either drink more alcohol or continue to abstain and allow the body-including brain cells-to adjust.

MaineGeneral
Residential Services for Women
9 Spruce Street,
Augusta, ME04330
(207) 621-7218
www.mainegeneral.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Women

As the largest private employer in the Kennebec Valley region, MaineGeneral Health is a comprehensive non-profit system that includes: A medical center with three campuses in Augusta and Waterville. A state-of-the-art regional outpatient cancer treatment center Physician practices Nursing homes Specialized rehabilitation, mental health and substance abuse services Home health care and hospice services Special care for patients with memory loss Community outreach programs and Retirement living options
MaineGeneral also keenly focuses on preventive health and supports many ongoing programs throughout our communities.
MaineGeneral
Residential Services for Men
2093 Belgrade Road,
Sidney, ME4330
(207) 547-3065
www.mainegeneral.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Men

As the largest private employer in the Kennebec Valley region, MaineGeneral Health is a comprehensive non-profit system that includes:

A medical center with three campuses in Augusta and Waterville
A state-of-the-art regional outpatient cancer treatment center
Physician practices
Nursing homes
Specialized rehabilitation, mental health and substance abuse services
Home health care and hospice services
Special care for patients with memory loss
Community outreach programs and
Retirement living options

MaineGeneral also keenly focuses on preventive health and supports many ongoing programs throughout our communities.

Our Physicians
The 250+ physicians on our active medical staff come from some of the country's finest medical schools and training programs and provide an array of specialty services from anesthesiology to urology.

Our Patients
We serve patients from 88 cities and towns throughout the Kennebec Valley region, providing them with the broad spectrum of services they need for every phase of their lives.

Our Commitment to the Kennebec Valley
Our mission is to enhance, every day, the health of the people of the greater Kennebec Valley.

We follow this mission with a forward-looking vision of focusing on clinical excellence, customer satisfaction, financial stability and positively impacting the health of our community each day.

Alcohol Abuse

Provided By: 

Alcohol Abuse

Jackpine

Friday, September 14, 2007 Alcoholism exists when brain cells have become accustomed to or addicted to alcohol. Alcohol crosses the blood-brain barrier in the brain and reaches sites where dendrites of brain cells take up alcohol molecules into cells, resulting in intoxification.

If a person starts regularly drinking in excess, the brain cells' dendrites must grow more receptor cites to take up the amount of alcohol present. Growth of more receptors is called "up-regulation". With extra receptors now existing, these receptors will react if there is insufficient alcohol to be taken up. This is called "withdrawal", and it makes a person ill until they either drink more alcohol or continue to abstain and allow the body-including brain cells-to adjust. This is called "down regulation".

Specifically, the added receptor cites on the end of brain cell dentrites will decrease in number. The decrease of receptors for alcohol occurs because the person is no longer providing alcohol for extra receptors to have to take up.

Alcoholism is an addiction at the cellular and molecular level, like other drugs. If a person stops drinking, they will be ill while the receptors for alcohol decrease in the brain and the body adjusts. Thereafter, a person must slowly begin to rebuild their lives in a sober manner which can be done, especially with the support of rehab centres and support groups.

It is worth the effort to stop drinking in order to next experience life as a sober person. We only have one chance to live this life here on earth; best to live it sober and healthy because even an intoxicated person knows in his/her heart that a sober and healthy life is the right way to live.

Alcoholics may feel badly about themselves and their alcoholism because they know there is a better, healthy way to live. There is always hope for a sober and good life. And there is nonjudgemental assistance.

There are many rehab treatment ...

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