Alcohol Detox Morgantown WV

Alcohol can take over a person's life, it can have a great impact on the individuals life as well as the lives of the loved ones around them. If you're close to a friend, parent, brother, or sister who has a drug problem, it will affect you in ways you may not easily realize, and then you can get the same symptoms and problems, even if you don't do drugs or drink.

Valley Healthcare System
New Beginnings Program for Women
202 Columbia Street,
Fairmont, WV26554
(304) 296-2228
www.valleyhealthcare.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(304) 363-2228, (304) 296-1731

Hotline Phone Numbers: (800) 232-0020

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Women

Founded in 1969 by West Virginia University, Valley Counseling Services united with The Human Resources Association and incorporated as Valley Community Mental Health Services in 1972. Doing business as Valley HealthCare System, a nonprofit corporation, Valley has grown from a small counseling center located in the basement of a University building to a large multi-county, comprehensive behavioral health program.

Spurred by the federal government, funds became available through the passage of the Community Mental Health Center Act of 1963, introduced by President John F. Kennedy and Valley was able to establish itself as one of 13 federally-funded mental health centers in the state in the early 1970’s.

Over the years, Valley has continued to add to its array of services for people with disabilities, including services for individuals with developmental disabilities, mental health and chemical dependency issues.

We believe that the work that we do in Monongalia, Marion, Preston and Taylor Counties enhances the quality of life, not just for the persons served, but for everyone in those counties as well.
Valley Healthcare System
ACT Unit
100 Crosswind Drive,
Fairmont, WV26554
(304) 296-2228
www.valleyhealthcare.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(304) 363-2228, (304) 296-1731

Hotline Phone Numbers: (800) 232-0020

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Founded in 1969 by West Virginia University, Valley Counseling Services united with The Human Resources Association and incorporated as Valley Community Mental Health Services in 1972. Doing business as Valley HealthCare System, a nonprofit corporation, Valley has grown from a small counseling center located in the basement of a University building to a large multi-county, comprehensive behavioral health program.
Spurred by the federal government, funds became available through the passage of the Community Mental Health Center Act of 1963, introduced by President John F. Kennedy and Valley was able to establish itself as one of 13 federally-funded mental health centers in the state in the early 1970’s.
Over the years, Valley has continued to add to its array of services for people with disabilities, including services for individuals with developmental disabilities, mental health and chemical dependency issues.
We believe that the work that we do in Monongalia, Marion, Preston and Taylor Counties enhances the quality of life, not just for the persons served, but for everyone in those counties as well.
Fayette County
Drug and Alcohol Commission Inc
100 New Salem Road, Suite 106,
Uniontown, PA15401
(724) 438-3576x124
www.fcdaa.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(724) 438-3576x120, (724) 438-3576x138

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Private health insurance

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Men, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

Vision Statement:

It is the vision of FCDAC, Inc. to strive for addiction free living by making available within our community a well-trained professional staff who will provide the education, awareness and encouragement to empower individuals to make positive choices for total wellness.

Mission Statement:

Enhancing our community's quality of life by promoting addiction free living.

Diversity Statement:

Diversity refers to the various ethnic, cultural and demographic differences that exist among employees in our workforce. Diversity includes personal characteristics such as age, race, color, gender and disability as well as differences in backgrounds, values and beliefs. FCDAC, Inc. recognizes the importance of cultural diversity in the workplace, and is committed to enhancing our diversity and to demonstrating its commitment to our clients.

Alcohol is a Drug, a Disease

Provided By: 

Alcohol Is A Drug, A Disease

Jennifer Bulbrook

Friday, September 14, 2007 Alcohol is a drug, it can be a deadly drug if not consumed properly or in a mature manner. Alcohol is as dangerous and just as addicting as cocaine, marijuana or ecstasy.

My name is Jennifer Bulbrook, a Child and Youth Worker who has had the honor and privilege to work with youth in our community. When asking children of this generation to list names of drugs, very rarely will they name alcohol. I have ran drug programs and have came to the realization that many children and adolescents do not consider alcohol a drugand why because it is legal, you can but it at a local beer or liquor store.

Alcohol can take over a person's life, it can have a great impact on the individuals life as well as the lives of the loved ones around them. If you're close to a friend, parent, brother, or sister who has a drug problem, it will affect you in ways you may not easily realize, and then you can get the same symptoms and problems, even if you don't do drugs or drink.

Anyone can become addicted to alcohol, it does not matter how mature, responsible you are, your financial status, or what you do for a living. In order to help with one's addiction, one must identify the underlying issues. People drink, because, to start, it makes them feel good or erases feelings, but that's only the beginning. All drugs change the chemicals we have naturally in our brains and when the brain starts changing, adding to, subtracting from its own chemicals, that's a problem because those chemicals control our feelings and actions. Yes, alcohol may help one relax for awhile but the way the chemicals we all have in our brains work, you'll need more to get the same feelings of relaxation over time, then still more and the problems won't disappear, they'll get worse because you're avoiding them!

I am not only speaking as a professional but as someone who has personally experienced alcohols deadly effects. I am 25 years old with two small children and for the past seven years I have been struggling with my addiction to alcohol. Alcohol had taken over six years of my life. At first I would only have to consume a couple of drinks to take my pain away but soon I was drinking a 26er, sometimes more everyday, turning to the bottle when ever things were not going well, when I would have feelings of stress, anger, or depression. During the week, I was what you call a "closet drinker" where I would wait for everyone in my household to go to bed then I would crack open the bottle. On the weekend I would go out to the bar where I would get so polluted with the poison of alcohol that I would black out, I would wake up in strange places with strange people surrounding me. Alcohol would take away my feelings of depression but most of the times those feelings would resurface and hit me ten times harder and I became abusive (physically and emotionally) to those around me. Bigger yet, my main priority beca...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Addicted.com