Gambling Addiction Treatment Centers Grand Island NE

A new research study discovers a drug commonly used to treat alcohol addiction has a similar effect on pathological gamblers — it curbs the urge to gamble and participate in gambling-related behavior.

Prairie Institute of Pyschology
(308) 382-8604
207 N Pine St Ste 100
Grand Island, NE
 
Cornerstone Counseling
(308) 382-1764
3280 Woodridge Blvd
Grand Island, NE
 
Board of Mental Health Practice
(402) 471-2117
P.O. Box 94986
Lincoln, NE
 
Odyssey Iii Counseling Services Pc
(402) 371-7215
401 S 17th St
Norfolk, NE
 
Striebel John Psychgt
(308) 532-0777
102 Mcneel Ln
North Platte, NE
 
Denton Jerry Psychologist
(308) 382-8604
207 N Pine St
Grand Island, NE
 
Gruendel G David & Aileen D
(308) 381-2233
908 N Howard Ave Ste 107
Grand Island, NE
 
Great Plains Counseling Center, LLC
(402) 292-7712
205 Galvin Road North
Bellevue, NE
 
Compass Point
(402) 463-5075
225 N. Saint Joseph Ave
Hastings, NE
 
Meadows Behavioral Health
(402) 564-9888
5124 23rd St
Columbus, NE
 

Alcoholism Drug Helps Pathalogical Gamblers

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Alcoholism drug helps pathalogical gamblers

Rick Nauert, Ph.D.

Monday, June 16, 2008

A new research study discovers a drug commonly used to treat alcohol addiction has a similar effect on pathological gamblers — it curbs the urge to gamble and participate in gambling-related behavior.

In the investigation, University of Minnesota scientists studied seventy-seven people in a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

Fifty-eight men and women took 50, 100, or 150 milligrams of naltrexone every day for 18 weeks.

Forty percent of the 49 participants who took the drug and completed the study, quit gambling for at least one month.

Their urge to gamble also significantly dropped in intensity and frequency. The other 19 participants took a placebo. But, only 10.5 percent of those who took the placebo were able to abstain from gambling.

Study participants were aged 18 to 75 and reported gambling for 6 to 32 hours each week.

Dosage did not have an impact on the results, naltrexone was generally well tolerated, and men and women reported similar results.

“This is good news for people who have a gambling problem,” said Jon Grant, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., a University of Minnesota associate professor of psychiatry and principal investigator of the study.

“This is the first time people have a proven medication that can help them get their behavior under control.”

The research is published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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