Alcoholism Rehab Laconia NH

Alcoholism is a disease. Many people don't have enough knowdledge about it to see it that way...instead they see it as a self-inflicted burden. People who don't have the understanding of the addiction tend to look down on others for this disease, because perhaps they think it is the choice of the alcoholic to have a drinking problem or not.

Lakes Region General Hospital
Nathan Brody Chemical Dependency Prog
73 Daniel Webster Highway,
Belmont, NH3220
(603) 527-2908
www.lrgh.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(603) 527-2980

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders

Nestled in the beautiful Lakes and Three Rivers Regions of New Hampshire, LRGHealthcare is a not-for-profit healthcare charitable trust representing Lakes Region General Hospital (LRGH), Franklin Regional Hospital (FRH), 22 affiliated medical providers and service programs.
Our mission is to provide quality, compassionate care and to strengthen the well-being of our community. We are driven by healthcare needs of the communities we serve, and very proud of our long tradition of providing quality healthcare services to the Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.
About LRGHealthcareLRGH is a community and regional acute care facility with a licensed bed capacity of 137 beds, and FRH is a 25-bed critical access community hospital. In 2000, FRH and LRGH merged together and added the trade name LRGHealthcare. Committed to increasing our capacity for patients, adding more depth in staffing, and more options for patients, we knew that joining our hospitals would provide stability to both organizations, ultimately benefiting the communities we serve.
The Lakes Region communities we serve include, Laconia, Gilford, Alton, Ashland, Barnstead, Belmont, Center Harbor, Gilmanton, Meredith, Moultonborough, New Hampton and Sandwich. In the Three Rivers Region, we serve the communities of Franklin, Tilton, Northfield, Sanbornton, Alexandria, Andover, Bristol, Bridgewater, Boscawen, Danbury, Hebron, Hill and Salisbury.
We offer a wide range of medical, surgical, specialty, diagnostic, and therapeutic services, wellness education, support groups, and other community outreach services. Our Emergency Services department is staffed with specially trained physicians, nurses and staff, providing the highest quality care, delivered with the care and compassion. 24-hour availability of state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, and both ground and air transfer capability to tertiary care facilities. More than 200 active staff physicians and providers are in our network.
Together, LRGH, FRH, and all of our affiliated programs and services provide comprehensive healthcare to the entire Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.

Alcoholism

Provided By: 

Alcoholism

Seacrette Nolan

Friday, September 14, 2007 Alcoholism is a disease. Many people don't have enough knowdledge about it to see it that way...instead they see it as a self-inflicted burden. People who don't have the understanding of the addiction tend to look down on others for this disease, because perhaps they think it is the choice of the alcoholic to have a drinking problem or not. It's not that simple, to just "not drink". That doesn't solve the problem. It is, however, the alcoholic's responsibility to get help.

Some people have more of an addictive nature than others. Alcoholism is hereditary; passed on from generation to generation, much like heart disease. Alcholics suffer from an actual change in chemicals in their brain (like other addicts). It changes the way a person behaves, thinks, and reacts to situations...even when they are sober. It takes a while for the recovering alcoholic to obtain sane, healthy thinking. And even then they continue to battle cravings, urges and relapses.

There are various extremes of alcoholism, which seems to depend on how long an individual lets the disease control their life. The effects of it varies from person to person, because everyone is different as human beings to a certain extent. However, the problem for all alcholics is one in the same. They have an addiction....

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