Cocaine Addiction Treatment Centers Sheridan WY

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Volunteers of America Northern Rockies
The Gathering Place
360 College Meadows Drive,
Sheridan, WY82801
(307) 673-2510

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Halfway house

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Persons with HIV/AIDS, Gays and Lesbians, Seniors/older adults, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Residential beds for clients' children, Criminal justice clients

Volunteers of America was founded in 1896 by social reformers Ballington and Maud Booth. They envisioned a movement dedicated to “reaching and uplifting” the American people. On behalf of the organization, the Booths pledged to "go wherever we are needed, and do whatever comes to hand." That declaration has guided Volunteers of America’s outreach efforts ever since.

In turn-of-the-century America, there was no shortage of work to do. The Volunteers moved into tenement districts to care for people in poverty. They organized day nurseries and summer camps, provided housing for single men and women, and established the nation's first system of halfway houses for released prisoners.
The Great Depression of the 1930s stretched the nation's private social welfare system almost to the breaking point. Volunteers of America mobilized to assist the millions of people who were unemployed, hungry and homeless. Relief efforts included employment bureaus, wood yards, soup kitchens, and "Penny Pantries" where every food item cost one cent.

Volunteers of America served proudly on the home front during both world wars. The group operated canteens, overnight lodging and Sunday breakfasts for soldiers and sailors on leave. Affordable housing and child care were provided for defense industry workers. Further, Volunteers of America spearheaded community salvage drives during World War II, collecting millions of pounds of scrap metal, rubber and fiber for the war effort.

THE 1960s
Our special mission in housing dates to our organization's founding. Volunteers of America helped accelerate real estate development during the 1960s by taking part in numerous federal housing programs. Since 1968, Volunteers of America has developed over 300 affordable housing complexes in more than 30 states..

THE 1970s
In the 1970s, the organization emerged as a major provider of professional long-term nursing care. Today, Volunteers of America not only offers home health care and related services, but owns and operates several nursing facilities, and assisted and independent living residences.

Volunteers of America is one of the nation's largest and most comprehensive human services organizations, touching the lives of more than 2 million people each year in communities across the United States. Planning for the next 100 years, Volunteers of America will continue to prove that “there are no limits to caring.” - See more at:

The Difference Is We Knew Better: Interview With a Cocaine Addict - Addicted

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The Difference Is We Knew Better: Interview With a Cocaine Addict

Jeanne Sparks-Carreker

Friday, September 14, 2007 Ever wonder what it is like to live every second of every day with a craving for a substance which has not only destroyed your life, but which has destroyed the lives of those around you, taken away everyone's trust in you, and labeled you with a title that includes you in the same categories as the lowest members of society?

Brenda Manning of Birmingham, Alabama can relate. Her family has disowned her, the business which once held her as a top, valued employee, and which gave her employee of the month plaques three times in two years finally dismissed her. She has been evicted from the apartment she lived in with her children, and just this past November, she lost custody of her twelve year old daughter by a decision within the Family Court System of Jefferson County.

She now lives in a friend's home which has no power or water service because the bills have not been paid by the eight adult residents. Rather, any money accumulated has been used to purchase cocaine. Brenda is a 42 year old Caucasian female, and is noticeably restless as she sits down on the couch in the small, dirty livingroom. Our surroundings seem to lack everything, as if all the valuables and appliances that once sat in this small, old house has been used to barter another hit of cocaine.

JSC: When did you first start using drugs?

BRENDA: I started smoking pot when I was in junior high. I guess I was about twelve or thirteen. I got in with the wrong crowd, you know what I mean.

JSC: Did you finish school?

BRENDA: No, I dropped out when I was sixteen. I really stopped going when I was about fourteen. I just dodged the truancy people. They gave up after a while. Well, when we were kids, anyways.

JSC: What was your home life like back then, Brenda?

BRENDA: My mama worked a lot, I guess. I didn't know my father too good. She had too much to do and couldn't keep up with me, really. It was alright, but I didn't have anyone telling me what to do too much, so I got to do what I wanted.

JSC: When did you decide to try harder drugs?

BRENDA: I guess I was around eighteen, at a party, you know, the whole peer-pressure thing happening. I had been scared of the harder stuff, but then when I tried it, it didn't kill me. I liked it too much, too.

JSC: What drug was it that you tried at the party?

BRENDA: There were people free-basing cocaine. I knew I was hooked the first few seconds after I took a hit. It's owned me every since.

Two males had entered the livingroom from a far bedroom, and as Brenda commented on the cocaine "owning" her, they nodded in understanding, then made their way to another room to my left.

JSC: When did you have children?

BRENDA: I got pregnant with my first kid when I was twenty-two. I was workin' the streets to make money, truck stops and all. She went to live with my mother when I had her cause I didn't think I ...

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