Drug Rehab Centers Augusta GA

The distinction between physical dependence and addiction is separated using the term physical dependence for a narrower, older definition and the new definition of addiction. Physical dependence is mostly described as a simple cellular adaption of a substance to the body. It especially concen- trates on the neurons as the communication center and the chemical which the brain is influenced by. Read on for more.

Augusta Metro Treatment Center
525 Ellis Street,
Augusta, GA30901
(706) 722-3855
www.methadonetreatment.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Specializing in Pregnant/postpartum women, Women

Colonial Management Group, LP (CMG) is a unique organization of fifty-seven (57) private outpatient substance abuse treatment clinics that have been successfully treating opiate dependence since 1986. The Company, which is headquartered in Orlando, Florida, takes great pride in establishing and maintaining the values, mission, and direction of the organization. We are continuously searching for the most innovative techniques to utilize in our facilities to ensure the most comprehensive treatment experience resulting in the best outcome possible.
Aiken Center
1105 Gregg Highway,
Aiken, SC29801
(803) 649-1900
www.aikencenter.org

Hotline Phone Numbers: (803) 202-7460

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

The Aiken Center's Core Values
Prevention of addictive behaviors is achievable.
Recovery from addiction is achievable.
The success or failure of recovery must be assessed on the basis of individual needs, preferences, strengths and abilities.
The protection of rights of those being served is of paramount importance to the trust that forms the foundation of our relationships.
The positive and negative qualities of family life determine the qualities of the lives of those individuals who make up our families.
The ability to live with self-respect and dignity is critical to achievement of healthier lives and families.
Strengthening families will create a more productive and healthier community.
It is important to seek the input of the persons we serve to ensure that our services meet the needs of the Community.
Collaboration with other human service agencies helps to provide access to needed services in the Community.
The Aiken Center must remain financially and managerially strong so that we can continue to exist and assist those who need our help.
The Aiken County Commission on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services, DBA, The Aiken Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Services, is the public substance abuse service provider for Aiken County, SC. It holds 501 (c) 3 tax exemption status from the Internal Revenue Service. It has been in operation in Aiken County since February 12, 1974—over thirty-five years. Pursuant to SC Act 301 of 1973, it was made a “political component” of Aiken County, SC on January 1, 1980. The Aiken Center is one of thirty-three (33) local, sister substance abuse provider agencies that serve all forty-six (46) counties of SC.
The Aiken Center has been CARF (Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) accredited for behavioral health outpatient and prevention/diversion services for adults as well as behavioral health outpatient and prevention/diversion services for children and adolescents since 1994. It is licensed as an outpatient substance abuse treatment provider by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with Chapter 61-12-20 of the SC Code of Laws, the Aiken Center is the “designated county authority” for the provision of substance abuse services in Aiken County, SC through designation by the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services (DAODAS).
The Aiken Center functions as an independent entity under contracts with a variety of funding sources, including Aiken County, DAODAS, South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (Medicaid) and a variety of third-party payers. It has been a member agency of the United Way of Aiken County since 1981. It has a current annual budget of $1.7 million dollars. It serves 1,600 clients per year with 22,000 hours of direct treatment/intervention service by a staff of 30 members.
Hope House Inc
2205 Highland Avenue,
Augusta, GA30904
(706) 737-9879
www.hopehouseforwomen.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(706) 733-3463

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Persons with HIV/AIDS, Gays and Lesbians, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Residential beds for clients' children

The mission of Hope House Inc. is to apply a holistic approach to treatment in a long-term residential setting in order to break the cycle of chemical dependency for women, their dependent children, and their families.

Communication of the Addict Brain

Provided By: 

Communication of the Addict Brain

Karla Kiecolt-Blasdell

Thursday, January 03, 2008

The distinction between physical dependence and addiction is separated using the term physical dependence for a narrower, older definition and the new definition of addiction. Physical dependence is mostly described as a simple cellular adaption of a substance to the body. It especially concen- trates on the neurons as the communication center and the chemical which the brain is influenced by. In contrast, addiction is known to be a complex, lifelong disease of one''s entire self.

In studying human brain activity we have learned communication and impulses are carried from one cell to another. There are billions of nerve cells in the brain. These are called neurons. Most neurons have one branch that carry impulses away from the cell body. This branch is called an axon.

The outer part of the neuron where the branching of the axon begins is called the dendrite. A single neuron may have as many as 10,000 dendrites.

The dendrites then can receive signals from the axons from thousands of different neurons. Simply breaking down how neurons work in the brain focuses on the synapse, the space in the brain where the impulses pass between the cells. The synapse is tiny and continuously active. The activity is affected by both abusive drugs and psychoactive medications. The chemicals enter the bloodstream, pass through the blood-brain barrier and become part of the chemical bath that reaches all the synapses in the brain.

Psychoactive externally supplied chemicals inhibit transmission between particular groups of axons and dendrites.

Neurons primarily serve excitatory or inhibitory roles in the brain.

Abusive drugs fit both of these categories. Amphetamines and cocaine fall into the stimulant category and are primarily excitatory, whereas, alcohol and opiates fall into the depressant category and are primarily inhibitory.

Addiction is more than a chemical reaction in the brain. It also relies on three types of behavior-affecting stimuli described by psychologists. They

are: positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, and punishment. A good feeling is positive reinforcement, relief of a painful experience is con- sidered a negative reinforcement. The punishment is a consequence of a negative behavior. All three of these behaviors have direct application to the experience of addiction. Abused drugs directly affect the synapses in the pleasure centers of the brain. There are many activities and substances that impact the pleasure-producing neurons. When referring to addiction it principally involves two features: loss of control (unmanageable), dis- honesty (denial). Without these two features addiction cannot exist.

People who are addicted almost act as if they are hypnotized. They cannot tell you why they continue their use of drugs and alcohol despite the negative impact on their lives. Even though the loss over pleasure- driven behaviors is alw...

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