Eating Disorders Counseling Greenville NC

By getting to know ourselves, we can learn to set reasonable boundaries. It is hard to do this when we are not in touch with our feelings, thoughts, beliefs, likes, and dislikes. When we disconnect from our wants and needs, and instead focus on weight, body image, diet, and food, we lose valuable information. We also lose awareness of the inner guidance system that says “Something is wrong—a boundary needs to be set here.”

Ms. Pamela Chapman
Pamela A. Chapman , LCSW
(607) 327-3075
422 Cathay rd
Wilmington, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in New York
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Eating Disorders, Stress, Trauma/PTSD
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Tyler Beach
Private
(919) 428-8901
1829 E Franklin Street Suite 1200 A
Chapel Hill, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
6 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Eating Disorders, Interpersonal Relationships, Self Abuse, Sexual Orientation, Sexuality Issues
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Linda R. Barnett
(919) 490-0218
4100 Thetford Road
Durham, NC
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Couples Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Kentucky
Credentialed Since: 1985-02-20

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Patricia Heard
Phoenix Family Institute
(704) 542-9883
10720 Carmel Commons Blvd. Suite 330
Charlotte, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW,ACSW,LMFT,LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Career/Employment Concerns, Couple or Marital Issues, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Learning Disabilities, Multicultural Issues,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Obese or Overweight, College Students
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Gerard J. Musante
(919) 313-3106
Structure House
Durham, NC
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Tennessee
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-25

Data Provided by:
Richard S. Surwit
(919) 684-4317
Duke Univ Med Ctr
Durham, NC
Services
Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Biofeedback, Psychological Assessment, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Languages Spoken
French
Education Info
Doctoral Program: McGill University
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-20

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Kim Mitchell
Creative Solutions Counseling, LLC
(919) 782-0272
5561-201 McNeely Drive
Raleigh, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
27 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Infertility, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder,
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics), Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Disabled, Caregivers, Step Families, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Lisa Partin
Lisa Partin MSW, LCSW
(336) 392-3690
1107 West Market St
Greensboro, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
6 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Grandparents, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Charles H. Brown
(704) 333-2988
Get Your Head In The Game
Charlotte, NC
Services
Sports Psychology, Individual Psychotherapy, Couples Psychotherapy, Family Psychotherapy, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Southern Mississippi
Credentialed Since: 1981-09-24

Data Provided by:
Angela Redlak-Olcese
(704) 366-1264
6633 Fairview Rd
Charlotte, NC
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Alliant International University - Fresno
Credentialed Since: 2010-11-30

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Creating Boundaries: One Step on the Path to Freedom from Disordered Eating

Provided By: 

Creating Boundaries: One Step on the Path to Freedom from Disordered Eating

Rebecca Cooper - 7/10/2007

Boundaries are imaginary or real lines around our physical, emotional, or spiritual self that set limits for us and how we interact with others. Imaginary lines protect our thinking, feelings, and behavior. Real lines allow us to choose how close we allow others to come to us, as well as if and how we allow them to touch us. Boundaries help distinguish what our responsibilities are and are not.

By getting to know ourselves, we can learn to set reasonable boundaries. It is hard to do this when we are not in touch with our feelings, thoughts, beliefs, likes, and dislikes. When we disconnect from our wants and needs, and instead focus on weight, body image, diet, and food, we lose valuable information. We also lose awareness of the inner guidance system that says “Something is wrong—a boundary needs to be set here.”

It’s hard enough to get through the pain of life, but when we block it out with food distractions, we never learn how to take care of ourselves. Because our thoughts have been directed away from the hurt or pain to obsessive eating disordered thinking, we lose awareness of what caused the hurt or pain in the first place, and most important, how these situations could be avoided in the future.

What can cause a lack of boundaries?

People with eating disorders often have a poor sense of boundaries and a hard time saying no. Let’s say someone pressures you into going to a place where you feel very uncomfortable. If you are disconnected from your wants and needs, you won’t know what you really want to do. Everyone wants to be liked and accepted, so we say yes, rather than setting a boundary such as, “No, I don’t want to go there."

Now we are already feel uncomfortable being in this situation, so our thoughts start to focus on food instead of dealing with the real feelings at hand. “Should I eat? Shouldn’t I eat? What should I eat? What are people going to think if I eat?” All these obsessive thoughts start running through our heads. Then we start beating ourselves up for the eating disorder, instead of recognizing the steps to prevent these discomforting feelings in the first place.

Many of us use distractions to avoid looking at our own self. We may find a false sense of satisfaction in taking on other people’s tasks or trying to control situations. Our sense of worth can get so caught up from giving that we don’t realize our own duties, feelings, and responsibilities are being neglected.

When we begin to feel the stress from overcommitting ourselves or trying to control situations, we may turn to the eating disorder to ease our inability to do everything perfectly. This may cause us to feel very tired, frustrated, unappreciated, and unloved. When we think we have to do something in order to be loved we can never do enough. Other people are often not grateful that we have taken over their responsibilities and may feel a...

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