Alcohol Detoxification Treatments Bozeman MT

British researches have detected a correlation between drinking excessively and an increased risk for atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can trigger stroke or heart failure.

Alcohol and Drug Services of
Gallatin County
2310 North 7th Avenue,
Bozeman, MT59715
(406) 586-5493
www.adsgc.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
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Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

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Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, DUI/DWI offenders

Who we are
Alcohol and Drug Services of Gallatin County was founded in 1983. Agency director, Shelly Johnson, has worked for ADSGC for almost twenty-five years.
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The mission of Alcohol and Drug Services of Gallatin County is to provide confidential and caring addiction-focused services through
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Heavy Drinking Linked to Irregular Heart Rhythm

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Heavy Drinking Linked to Irregular Heart Rhythm

JoinTogether.org

Monday, May 14, 2007 British researches have detected a correlation between drinking excessively and an increased risk for atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm that can trigger stroke or heart failure, HealthDay News reported May 10.

The study, presented at the annual meeting of the Heart Rhythm Society, found that reducing alcohol consumption, even slightly, can make a major difference. Atrial fibrillation is the most common irregular heart rhythm and affects an estimated 5.1 million Americans, according to a recent study that appeared in the journal Circulation.

"Drinking in moderation …is safe and does not significantly increase the chances of developing new atrial fibrillation (AF)," said Dr. Joe Martins, lead study author and a cardiologist at the Imperial College, London. "However, drinking in excess of this was strongly associated with an increased probability of developing new AF."

For the study, researchers surveyed patients arriving at an arrhythmia clinic at Charing Cross Hospital in London about their weekly alcohol consumption. Excessive drinking was found to be much higher in patients with AF than in patients without AF (27% vs. 17%, respectively).

AF has been linked to binge drinking in the past, according to the study authors. Experts say that drinking has also been associated with cardiac disease.

Reprinted from JoinTogether.or...

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