Methadone Clinics Casper WY

Methadone has become the hot topic publicly due to it being finally accepted as a proper form of heroin and opiate addiction treatment. Universities and other medical institutions of learning have incorporated addiction into separate course studies, prior to the early part of this century, the only study on addiction in 4 years of medical school was approximately one hour in length, 3/4 of which was spent on alcohol addiction. Read on for more.

Wyoming Recovery
231 South Wilson Street,
Casper, WY82601
(307) 265-3791
www.wyomingrecovery.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Wyoming Recovery strives to provide cost-effective treatment that results in long-term sobriety and healthy productive lifestyles.

The members of our staff are trained professionals experienced in the treatment of addictions and are committed to providing the highest quality of treatment to meet each client's specific needs.

Treatment components include group and individual therapy, access to daily mutual help meetings, educational media, lecture presentations and group discussions.

Berton Toews, M.D., our medical director, is Wyoming's only full-time addiction specialist. He is directly involved in all aspects of client care including treatment planning, education, staff supervision, and the management of medical detoxification.

Wyoming Recovery is different.

Our treatment approach is holistic, addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of recovery.
Our treatment is individualized in intensity, duration and scheduling, with a commitment to building links to the client’s home community resources.
Our programs strongly encourage client family members to participate in treatment; Family therapy is integrated into each client's treatment plan.
Our inpatient and intensive outpatient programs are followed by aftercare for our graduates to complete a full year of therapy.
Our campus gives each client a safe and comfortable environment that nurtures serenity and assists in the recovery process.
Our facilities and treatment programs are fully accredited by the Joint Commission and licensed by the State of Wyoming.

Methadone: Is it Really a Proper Treatment for Heroin Addicts?

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Methadone: Is it Really a Proper Treatment For Heroin Addicts?

Ericka Lear

Friday, September 14, 2007 Methadone has become the hot topic publicly due to it being finally accepted as a proper form of heroin and opiate addiction treatment. Universities and other medical institutions of learning have incorporated addiction into separate course studies, prior to the early part of this century, the only study on addiction in 4 years of medical school was approximately one hour in length, 3/4 of which was spent on alcohol addiction.

Public perception tends to fall behind on medical acceptance; until recently, the general consensus on depression and other mental health disorders was one of character defect, a flaw in willpower, or just plain laziness (i.e. "If they would just get up and start doing something, they'd be fine.") Many people still avidly believe today that addiction is only caused through choice and that society should not be responsible for the poor choices of another person. Interestingly, it should be noted that many medical disorders which plague our society are primarily based on a poor choice. Heart disease, differing types of cancers, diabetes (especially type II), and AIDS occur when the afflicted makes a choice in life which negatively affects health. Knowing this, it is interesting to see the differences in attitudes between the aforementioned diseases and addiction. How many people would turn out for a Relay for Life to fight addiction, or a telethon to raise money to improve addiction treatment?

That being said, methadone is currently considered by the medical community to be the gold standard for opiate addiction treatment. Why? It seems odd that physicians would treat heroin/opiate addiction with a synthetic opiate and those ignorant to the mechanics and progression of addiction believe that it is just trading one addiction for another.

The first problem we come across publicly is the tendency to combine dependence and addiction into one group. Dependence is when a patient ceases taking medication, when to do so causes a set of aggravating abnormal effects of withdrawal. It can be fatal in some medications when abruptly ceased. Addiction has a component of dependence within it, however there is an all-encompassing attribute of behavioral, physical, and emotional changes that occur specifically with it that does not occur when just dependent.

Next, the advent of the MRI proved the postulating theory of Dr Vincent Dole and Dr Marie Nyswander; that opiate addiction is a metabolic disorder which causes multiple changes in the brain and body which can be permanent. Opiates, when artificially administered with no source of physical pain, causes a decrease or cessation of endorphin function. Endorphins are chemicals that are released by the body that help to regulate a number of processes, most notably mood, sleep, motivation, stress, sexual drive, and hunger. When a disruption occurs in the system, then ra...

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