Methadone Clinics Greeley CO

Methadone has become the hot topic publicly due to it being finally accepted as a proper form of heroin and opiate addiction treatment. Universities and other medical institutions of learning have incorporated addiction into separate course studies, prior to the early part of this century, the only study on addiction in 4 years of medical school was approximately one hour in length, 3/4 of which was spent on alcohol addiction. Read on for more.

Certified Addiction Trt for Substances
1008 8th Street,
Greeley, CO80631
(970) 351-0248
www.catsllc.biz

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in Adolescents, DUI/DWI offenders

To educate adolescents and adults to make wise, informed decisions on drugs, alcohol, and related issues in daily life. Provide responsive services to individuals whose condition permits treatment in a non-residential setting.
C.A.T.S. is a state licensed agency. All counselors are state certified and the interns are working toward certification.
All services are in English and Spanish. Classes are offered throughout the day on Monday through Thursday.
All classes are age appropriate.
C.A.T.S. is designed to fit the individual needs of the client. No person will be turned away on the basis of race, religion or financial status. Everyone has the right to be treated equally with the understanding that we can all learn from each other.
Adolescents may enroll with or without parent consent although parent consent is preferred.
Fee arrangements can be made if necessary.
A New Perspective Counseling Centers
1226 West Ash Street, Suite D,
Windsor, CO80550
(970) 686-8898
www.anewperspective.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in Adolescents, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

We offer: Substance Abuse Counseling (DUI Level I and Level II Therapy), Relapse Prevention, Offender Therapy, SSC or SSIC (Strategies for Self-Improvement and Change), Individual Counseling, Domestic Violence Treatment, Anger Management and Minors in Possession (MIP). Also check out our services page for more options.

A New Perspective Counseling Centers, P.C. is a state-licensed treatment provider with trained and certified employees. A New Perspective has locations in Loveland, Fort Collins and Windsor, CO.

The Program Director at A New Perspective Counseling Centers , Anne Gleditsch, has over 25 years experience in Substance Abuse Counseling, a Masters of Psychology (M.A.) with an emphasis in Marriage & Family Therapy - University of Northern Colorado, is a Licensed Professional Counselor (L.P.C.), a Certified Addictions Counselor III (C.A.C.III), a Sexual Abuse Specialist, and is a registered Domestic Violence provider.

A New Perspective Counseling also has a division of Alcohol & Drug Abuse approved services: Level I DUI Education, Level II DUI Education, Level II DUI Outpatient Therapy, Intensive Outpatient Therapy (IOP), Enhanced Outpatient Therapy (EOP);Treatment of Minors, Treatment of Women, Offender Education, Offender Treatment, Urinalysis (UA), Monitored Antabuse and Breathalyzer Blood Alcohol Testing (BAs, BACs).

Methadone: Is it Really a Proper Treatment for Heroin Addicts?

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Methadone: Is it Really a Proper Treatment For Heroin Addicts?

Ericka Lear

Friday, September 14, 2007 Methadone has become the hot topic publicly due to it being finally accepted as a proper form of heroin and opiate addiction treatment. Universities and other medical institutions of learning have incorporated addiction into separate course studies, prior to the early part of this century, the only study on addiction in 4 years of medical school was approximately one hour in length, 3/4 of which was spent on alcohol addiction.

Public perception tends to fall behind on medical acceptance; until recently, the general consensus on depression and other mental health disorders was one of character defect, a flaw in willpower, or just plain laziness (i.e. "If they would just get up and start doing something, they'd be fine.") Many people still avidly believe today that addiction is only caused through choice and that society should not be responsible for the poor choices of another person. Interestingly, it should be noted that many medical disorders which plague our society are primarily based on a poor choice. Heart disease, differing types of cancers, diabetes (especially type II), and AIDS occur when the afflicted makes a choice in life which negatively affects health. Knowing this, it is interesting to see the differences in attitudes between the aforementioned diseases and addiction. How many people would turn out for a Relay for Life to fight addiction, or a telethon to raise money to improve addiction treatment?

That being said, methadone is currently considered by the medical community to be the gold standard for opiate addiction treatment. Why? It seems odd that physicians would treat heroin/opiate addiction with a synthetic opiate and those ignorant to the mechanics and progression of addiction believe that it is just trading one addiction for another.

The first problem we come across publicly is the tendency to combine dependence and addiction into one group. Dependence is when a patient ceases taking medication, when to do so causes a set of aggravating abnormal effects of withdrawal. It can be fatal in some medications when abruptly ceased. Addiction has a component of dependence within it, however there is an all-encompassing attribute of behavioral, physical, and emotional changes that occur specifically with it that does not occur when just dependent.

Next, the advent of the MRI proved the postulating theory of Dr Vincent Dole and Dr Marie Nyswander; that opiate addiction is a metabolic disorder which causes multiple changes in the brain and body which can be permanent. Opiates, when artificially administered with no source of physical pain, causes a decrease or cessation of endorphin function. Endorphins are chemicals that are released by the body that help to regulate a number of processes, most notably mood, sleep, motivation, stress, sexual drive, and hunger. When a disruption occurs in the system, then ra...

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