Alcohol Detox Center Casper WY

Using a drug to treat addiction may seem ironic, but doctors say it can work. How? The drug blocks the brain receptor that may associate reward benefits with drinking. There are other drugs to help with alcohol addiction, but they have to be taken daily, and often with pretty harsh side effects like sweating, vomiting, and rapid heart beat.

Wyoming Recovery
231 South Wilson Street,
Casper, WY82601
(307) 265-3791
www.wyomingrecovery.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Wyoming Recovery strives to provide cost-effective treatment that results in long-term sobriety and healthy productive lifestyles.

The members of our staff are trained professionals experienced in the treatment of addictions and are committed to providing the highest quality of treatment to meet each client's specific needs.

Treatment components include group and individual therapy, access to daily mutual help meetings, educational media, lecture presentations and group discussions.

Berton Toews, M.D., our medical director, is Wyoming's only full-time addiction specialist. He is directly involved in all aspects of client care including treatment planning, education, staff supervision, and the management of medical detoxification.

Wyoming Recovery is different.

Our treatment approach is holistic, addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of recovery.
Our treatment is individualized in intensity, duration and scheduling, with a commitment to building links to the client’s home community resources.
Our programs strongly encourage client family members to participate in treatment; Family therapy is integrated into each client's treatment plan.
Our inpatient and intensive outpatient programs are followed by aftercare for our graduates to complete a full year of therapy.
Our campus gives each client a safe and comfortable environment that nurtures serenity and assists in the recovery process.
Our facilities and treatment programs are fully accredited by the Joint Commission and licensed by the State of Wyoming.

Monthly Shot Could Help Fight Alcohol Addiction

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Monthly shot could help fight alcohol addiction

Kafi Drexel

Friday, February 08, 2008

It''s an uphill battle many alcoholics struggle with: resisting the craving to drink. While it''s certainly no cure, some doctors say a monthly shot could help more alcohol-dependent patients fight the urge.

“Vivitrol is an injectable form of a medicine known as Naltrexone. Naltrexone is available in oral form, but this is an injectable form, which is given to the patient once-a-month for several reasons: to increase compliance, so patients don''t have to worry about taking the pill; and it delivers a level of drug, which is really very adequate for dealing with alcohol issues,” says Clinical Assistant Professor at NYU Dr. Steven Lamm.

Using a drug to treat addiction may seem ironic, but doctors say it can work. How? The drug blocks the brain receptor that may associate reward benefits with drinking. There are other drugs to help with alcohol addiction, but they have to be taken daily, and often with pretty harsh side effects like sweating, vomiting, and rapid heart beat.

Doctors say the once-a-month injectable cuts down on that. One patient says she wouldn''t call the shot a miracle drug, but it''s the only thing that''s helped her with 15 years of addiction.

“It''s been very helpful. I haven’t been drinking as much. I don''t drink every day. I used to before I took Vivitrol and when I do drink, I drink a lot less than I used to,” says the recovery alcoholic, who asked to remain anonymous.

While the shot doesn''t necessarily stop alcoholics from drinking, doctors say being able to dramatically reduce the amount of heavy drinking days for patients has a huge impact on physical and emotional health.

“Our belief has been that abstinence is the goal for alcoholism and I believe that myself, but at this point I am at least satisfied my patients are drinking significantly less,” says Dr. Lamm. “When they are drinking less there quality of life and t...

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