Alcohol Detoxification Facilities Grand Island NE

Alcohol-dependent individuals with a family history of alcoholism or problem drinking exhibited reduced brain growth compared to alcohol-dependent people with no family history of alcohol problems, according to new research from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Substance Abuse Treatment
2201 North Broadwell Street, Unit 116-B,
Grand Island, NE68803
(308) 382-3660x92296
www.va.gov

Intake Phone Numbers:
(308) 382-3660x92331

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days), Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Men

Mission Statement
To fulfill President Lincoln's promise “To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan” by serving and honoring the men and women who are America’s veterans.
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Core values describe an organization's culture and character and serve as the foundation for the way individuals in an organization interact with each other and with people outside of the organization. The Department of Veterans Affairs Core Values and Characteristics apply across the entire VA enterprise.

Parental Drinking Stunts Brain Growth in Alcoholic Kids, Study Suggests

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Parental Drinking Stunts Brain Growth in Alcoholic Kids, Study Suggests

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Friday, February 23, 2007 Alcohol-dependent individuals with a family history of alcoholism or problem drinking exhibited reduced brain growth compared to alcohol-dependent people with no family history of alcohol problems, according to new research from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

Researchers said the findings showed that alcohol-related brain damage can be caused not only by heavy drinking but also genetics and environmental factors. "Our study is the first to demonstrate that brain size among alcohol-dependent individuals with a family history of alcoholism is reduced even before the onset of alcohol dependence," said study lead author Jodi Gilman of Brown University.

The NIAAA researchers used MRI scans to measure brain volume. They found that the average intracranial volume of adult alcoholic children of alcoholics was 4 percent lower than that of adult alcoholics with no family history of alcohol problems.

The study was published in the online edition of the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Reference:

Gilman, J.M., James M. Bjorka, J.M., Hommer, D.W. (2007) Parental Alcohol Use and Brain Volumes in Early- and Late-Onset Alcoholics. Biological Psychiatry, Article in Press; doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.10.029.

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