Treatment for Eating Disorder Greenville NC

Relationships take time and energy to develop, but so does disordered eating. I spent so much time around the thoughts of what or what not to eat, eating, and then hiding what I had done, that I didn't have the time necessary to create healthy, authentic relationships. I was uncomfortable being around other people because I felt inadequate and ashamed of my eating disorder.

Mr. Tyler Beach
Private
(919) 428-8901
1829 E Franklin Street Suite 1200 A
Chapel Hill, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
6 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Eating Disorders, Interpersonal Relationships, Self Abuse, Sexual Orientation, Sexuality Issues
Populations Served
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Sara Peach
North Duke Psychotherapy Offices
(919) 471-6501
400 Crutchfield Street Suite C
Durham, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
22 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Stress
Populations Served
ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics)
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Richard S. Surwit
(919) 684-4317
Duke Univ Med Ctr
Durham, NC
Services
Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Biofeedback, Psychological Assessment, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Languages Spoken
French
Education Info
Doctoral Program: McGill University
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-20

Data Provided by:
Susan Ann Varady
(919) 883-1636
1504 Michaux Road
Chapel Hill, NC
Services
Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Sports Psychology, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Languages Spoken
German
Education Info
Doctoral Program: George Mason University
Credentialed Since: 2007-09-06

Data Provided by:
The Renfrew Center of North Carolina
(800) REN-FREW
6633 Fairview Road
Charlotte, NC
Specialty
Eating disorders treatment center
Additional Information
The Renfrew Center is a women's mental health center with locations in Philadelphia and Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; Coconut Creek, Florida; New York City; Southern Connecticut; Northern New Jersey; Charlotte, North Carolina, and Nashville, TN, as well as a nationwide professional resource network. We specialize in the treatment of eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder), trauma, anxiety, depression, and other women's issues.

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Lisa Partin
Lisa Partin MSW, LCSW
(336) 392-3690
1107 West Market St
Greensboro, NC
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW
Licensed in North Carolina
6 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Bipolar Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Domestic Violence, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Caregivers, Step Families, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Grandparents, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Gerard J. Musante
(919) 313-3106
Structure House
Durham, NC
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Tennessee
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-25

Data Provided by:
Suzanne Bates
(919) 929-9932
1829 E. Franklin
Chapel Hill, NC
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Individual Psychotherapy, Group Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Loyola University of Chicago
Credentialed Since: 2006-04-10

Data Provided by:
Linda R. Barnett
(919) 490-0218
4100 Thetford Road
Durham, NC
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Couples Psychotherapy
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Kentucky
Credentialed Since: 1985-02-20

Data Provided by:
Ms. Pamela Chapman
Pamela A. Chapman , LCSW
(607) 327-3075
422 Cathay rd
Wilmington, NC
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in New York
15 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Eating Disorders, Stress, Trauma/PTSD
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Relationships and Disordered Eating

Provided By: 

Relationships and Disordered Eating

Rebecca Cooper - 7/11/2007

I have learned many things about myself that I did not know when I had an eating disorder. One is that food was my best friend, my primary relationship. I "went" to food like some people would go to a trusted friend or confidant.

When Food is the Primary Relationship
Relationships take time and energy to develop, but so does disordered eating. I spent so much time around the thoughts of what or what not to eat, eating, and then hiding what I had done, that I didn't have the time necessary to create healthy, authentic relationships. I was uncomfortable being around other people because I felt inadequate and ashamed of my eating disorder. I was afraid that they would find out about my secret and confirm that I was a bad person. It felt safer and more comfortable to be at home alone with my eating disorder than trying to fit in socially. Using food in this manner prevented me from building social skills.
It was also impossible for me to be honest, which is important in relationships, because I had to hide what I was doing -exercising to extreme, spending huge amounts of time, energy and money on bingeing and purging, disappearing after meals, etc. Although communication is part of any social interaction, when I was in the depths of my eating disorder, I had nothing to talk about. Was I going to say that I ate a quart of ice cream by myself last night? The disorder took the place of hobbies, interests, and other activities that most people find interesting.
So, although food seemed like my "best" friend, the shame of it robbed me of any other relationship. It even prevented me from knowing and being the real me. Eventually, it became necessary to give up the eating disorder in order to find out who I was. It became more important for me to experience love than to hold onto the eating disorder.

Replacing Food with Friends
One important part of recovery, then, is being able to speak the truth, instead of hiding behind food. Learning skills such as negotiation, humor, anger management, compromise, and cooperation is essential to that process. If you have used an eating disorder as means of communication, developing these skills will take courage and practice.
Also, in order to have an authentic, healthy relationship with another person, you must be willing to get to know yourself and then be vulnerable enough to share that self, faults and all. Pretending to be someone other than who ...

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