Treatment for Eating Disorder West Plains MO

Relationships take time and energy to develop, but so does disordered eating. I spent so much time around the thoughts of what or what not to eat, eating, and then hiding what I had done, that I didn't have the time necessary to create healthy, authentic relationships. I was uncomfortable being around other people because I felt inadequate and ashamed of my eating disorder.

Dr. Robin Turner
Dr. Robin L. Turner
(314) 726-1555
141 N. Meramec Ave. #208/209
Clayton, MO
Credentials
Credentials: MSW, LCSW, PSY.D
Licensed in Missouri
30 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Adoption/Foster Care, Aging, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Depression, Eating Disorders, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Learning Disabilities, Parenting Issues, Psychoses/Major Mental Illness, Self Abuse, Stress
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Disabled, Gifted, Chronic Illness, Cancer Patients
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Jillon Vander Wal
(314) 977-2282
Saint Louis University, Dept of Psychology
St. Louis, MO
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Missouri - Columbia
Credentialed Since: 2004-10-27

Data Provided by:
James Novalany
(417) 451-4565
Ozark Ctr
Neosho, MO
Services
Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Stress Management or Pain Management, Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Credentialed Since: 1999-04-15

Data Provided by:
Kathryn B. Pieper
(816) 234-3674
Developmental Behavioral Sciences
Kansas City, MO
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Family Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Kansas
Credentialed Since: 1995-09-12

Data Provided by:
Emily Ann Hamilton
(314) 516-5711
7579 Amhurst Avenue
St. Louis, MO
Services
Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia), Individual Psychotherapy, PostTraumatic Stress Disorder or Acute Trauma Reaction
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Missouri - Columbia
Credentialed Since: 2010-04-19

Data Provided by:
Ms. Beth Parker
BodyMind Connections
(573) 442-5475
409 Vandiver Dr., Building 6, Suite 104
Columbia, MO
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Missouri
20 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Self Abuse, Stress, Trauma/PTSD, Life Transitions, Sexuality Issues, Women's Issues
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Shirley Schaper
Counseling Services
(314) 275-2500
WoodsmillTowers 14323 South Outer 40, Ste 607 S
Chesterfield, MO
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Missouri
32 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Aging, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Behavioral Problems, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Eating Disorders, Family Dysfunction, Grief/Loss, Interpersonal Relationships, Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder, Parenting Issues, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Spiritual/Religiou
Populations Served
Interracial Families/Couples
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59), Seniors (60 +)

Data Provided by:
Mr. Ernest Garrett III
Garrett LCSW & Consulting, L.L.C.
(314) 282-2718
314 N. Broadway Ste. 708
St. Louis, MO
Credentials
Credentials: C-ACYFSW
Licensed in Missouri
5 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Other (gambling, sex, etc.), Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Behavioral Problems, Child Abuse and Neglect, Depression, Eating Disorders, Interpersonal Relationships, Multicultural Issues
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual, Offenders/Perpetrators, Disabled, Sensory Impaired (hearing, vision, etc), Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial, Obese or Overweight
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Preschool (Under 6), Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Dorothy J. Van Buren
(314) 286-2097
Washington Univ. School of Med. Dept of Psych.
St. Louis, MO
Services
Eating Disorder (e.g., compulsive eating, anorexia, bulimia)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Louisiana State University
Credentialed Since: 1995-04-17

Data Provided by:
Dr. Pamela Darby-Mullins
(816) 659-1319
Psychotherapy Associates1 Ward Parkway
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Eating Disorders, Anxiety or Fears, Loss or Grief
Qualification
School: University of Missouri - Kansas City
Year of Graduation: 2007
Years In Practice: 4 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Adults,Elders (65+)
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: Yes
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: Medicare

Data Provided by:

Relationships and Disordered Eating

Provided By: 

Relationships and Disordered Eating

Rebecca Cooper - 7/11/2007

I have learned many things about myself that I did not know when I had an eating disorder. One is that food was my best friend, my primary relationship. I "went" to food like some people would go to a trusted friend or confidant.

When Food is the Primary Relationship
Relationships take time and energy to develop, but so does disordered eating. I spent so much time around the thoughts of what or what not to eat, eating, and then hiding what I had done, that I didn't have the time necessary to create healthy, authentic relationships. I was uncomfortable being around other people because I felt inadequate and ashamed of my eating disorder. I was afraid that they would find out about my secret and confirm that I was a bad person. It felt safer and more comfortable to be at home alone with my eating disorder than trying to fit in socially. Using food in this manner prevented me from building social skills.
It was also impossible for me to be honest, which is important in relationships, because I had to hide what I was doing -exercising to extreme, spending huge amounts of time, energy and money on bingeing and purging, disappearing after meals, etc. Although communication is part of any social interaction, when I was in the depths of my eating disorder, I had nothing to talk about. Was I going to say that I ate a quart of ice cream by myself last night? The disorder took the place of hobbies, interests, and other activities that most people find interesting.
So, although food seemed like my "best" friend, the shame of it robbed me of any other relationship. It even prevented me from knowing and being the real me. Eventually, it became necessary to give up the eating disorder in order to find out who I was. It became more important for me to experience love than to hold onto the eating disorder.

Replacing Food with Friends
One important part of recovery, then, is being able to speak the truth, instead of hiding behind food. Learning skills such as negotiation, humor, anger management, compromise, and cooperation is essential to that process. If you have used an eating disorder as means of communication, developing these skills will take courage and practice.
Also, in order to have an authentic, healthy relationship with another person, you must be willing to get to know yourself and then be vulnerable enough to share that self, faults and all. Pretending to be someone other than who ...

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