Elderly Alcoholism Intervention West Des Moines IA

The Golden Years do not come gently into our lives and unfortunately we may not be prepared for it. Suddenly we find ourselves retired from our jobs and we must prepare ourselves for a new way of life. Many of us have hobbies. Some people volunteer to work for organizations. Many relocate away from family and friends and swear that they are off to experience a new way of life.

MECCA Services
5525 Meredith Street, Suite C,
Des Moines, IA50311
(515) 262-0349
www.meccaservices.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Access to Recovery

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in DUI/DWI offenders

MECCA Services is a community-based, not-for-profit organization offering substance abuse and behavioral health services from eight locations in the primary service area of Cedar, Iowa, Johnson, Polk, Warren, and Washington Counties.
MECCA programs and services span the entire treatment and prevention continuum. Our staff is committed to providing the best possible individualized care to our clients. MECCA is licensed by the Iowa Dept. of Public Health to provide substance abuse and problem gambling services and is accredited as a mental health care provider through the Iowa Dept. of Human Services.
Bridges of Iowa
1985 Northeast 51st Place,
Des Moines, IA50313
(515) 287-8255
www.bridgesofiowa.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Access to Recovery

Specializing in Men, Criminal justice clients

Mission Statement
Bridges of Iowa is a faith-based substance abuse treatment program which addresses the root causes of addiction and criminality building a bridge to a productive life in service to society.
The BOI Vision Statement
Graduates of the Bridges of Iowa program will live a transformed and successful life by remaining free from alcohol, drugs and crime. They will continue an individual spiritual journey and further develop a relationship with God. They will be successfully employed and contribute positively to their families and to the communities in which they live and work
United Community Services
4908 Franklin Avenue,
Des Moines, IA50310
(515) 280-3860
www.ucsonline.org

Hotline Phone Numbers: (515) 280-3860

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in Women, Men, Criminal justice clients

United Community Services (UCS) is an Iowa-based non-profit corporation and is licensed by the State of Iowa to provide substance abuse treatment services. The current organization was incorporated on November 11, 1997. UCS is managed by a volunteer Board of Directors and the day-to-day operations are managed by the Executive Director.
The mission of UCS is to provide quality care in a recovery focused system. Our vision is to provide care in partnership with persons served and in collaboration with the community to improve health and quality of life. Individuals served are the cornerstone of our business and clinical standards. Our relationship with them must be built upon honesty, credibility, professionalism, and mutual respect.
Our motto is: Recovery Begins with Hope.
Over the past three years, UCS has treated approximately 2,400 individuals for addiction. Services provided include: assessment, treatment planning, individual and group therapies and medication assisted treatment. Our staff is comprised of certified addiction counselors, three pharmacists and one physician who all work together to use various best practices and philosophies to tailor an effective plan for each individual client, as well as, family members in certain cases. Aftercare services are provided along with community resource referrals. Case management services provide financial, job, health and housing resources to clients.
Please contact United Community Services at 515-280-3860. UCS staff members will answer any questions you may have and provide assistance as needed.
Iowa Lutheran Hospital
Powell Chemical Dependency Center
700 East University Avenue, 4th Floor,
Des Moines, IA50316
(515) 263-2424
www.iowahealth.org/powell

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Hospital inpatient, Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

UnityPoint Health - Des Moines provides coordinated clinic, hospital and home-based care for patients in Des Moines and Central Iowa.

We are led by nearly 290 physicians and providers working in more than 50 UnityPoint Clinic locations. They are supported by our state-of-the-art UnityPoint Health - Des Moines hospitals - Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Iowa Lutheran Hospital, Blank Children's Hospital and Methodist West Hospital - and cancer center along with our home health care services, UnityPoint at Home.

Road to Recovery: The Elderly and Alcoholism

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Road to Recovery: The Elderly and Alcoholism

Carol Greenberg

Friday, September 14, 2007 Perhaps, the most difficult thing for people of advanced years to do is to give up an old habit. That habit of drinking too much alcohol. It may have started out as a cocktail or two before dinner followed with a glass of wine with dinner and maybe a brandy before bedtime but now that we find ourselves in the Golden Years and with time on our hands the drinking may have increased and we have become alcoholics. Of course, we would never admit it. We stay in denial until well meaning friends or family members tell us that we drink too much. Naturally, we become defensive and sometimes very nasty and tell them to mind their own business. This attitude has divided families and chased away friends.

The Golden Years do not come gently into our lives and unfortunately we may not be prepared for it. Suddenly we find ourselves retired from our jobs and we must prepare ourselves for a new way of life. Many of us have hobbies. Some people volunteer to work for organizations. Many relocate away from family and friends and swear that they are off to experience a new way of life. Others stay at home, become depressed, or too ill to contemplate a change. Illness, doctors, a lack of family involvement, and the horror of facing death can be the cause of many cases of depression. And, depression can lead to drowning one's sorrows in that bottle of alcohol.

Mildred B., a seventy year old grandmother, thought she was handling her retirement well. She volunteered at the library, walked her dog, and enjoyed preparing her own meals. Every evening she would prepare a Martini and eat dinner watching TV. As time passed she began to have two Martinis and then three and would skip dinner entirely. Her children noticed her mood swings and became worried when they would call and she would ramble over the phone. They knew that she had been drinking but did not know how to stop her. Finally, one night, after she had too much she fell asleep in her chair and when suddenly awakened, stood up, fell and broke her hip.

This is not an unusual story. I spoke to Dr. James Kohl, an orthopedist, who told me that many of his elderly patients come to his office with fractures, broken bones, or worse, and the first thing he asks them if they are alcoholics. If they deny it he gives them a written test prepared by John Hopkins University. He confirmed that blackouts are common among alcoholics, especially the elderly. He said, although many people can drink socially and in moderation, as we age, that ability diminishes, though few of us realize it. Our motor skills naturally decrease, and the risk of falling increases. Many seniors, for example take medications for high blood pressure, heart disease and more. Mixing alcohol with those medications can be lethal.

I also interviewed Dr. Sharon Richter, a certified addictions counselor, who explained that much of the alcohol problem to the m...

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