Drug Abuse Treatment Centers Daly City CA

Some of us spend our entire lives chasing an elusive feel-good sensation, whether it comes from drinking, smoking, taking drugs, spending too fast and freely, or overeating. Teachers, lawyers, doctors, students, homemakers, athletes, young and old, rich and poor, it makes no difference who you are or where you live. Anyone can become dependent. Alcohol dependency is by far the most common addiction, but certainly not the only one.

Bayview Hunters Point Foundation
Substance Abuse Programs
1625 Carroll Avenue,
San Francisco, CA94124
(415) 822-8200x12
www.bayviewci.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(415) 822-8200x14

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

BVHP Foundation's Administrative Offices (the Foundation) house the Executive Staff, Human Resources, and Accounting. The Foundation has been managing multiple locations, programs, and services from its Core to Partner Programs for the past 40 years; and it continues to adapt its programs and services to the changing community issues.
The Foundation’s focus: “To build an empowered, clean, safe, and healthy community.”
BVHP Foundation Youth Services is funded by the City and County of San Francisco and the San Francisco Youth Guidance Center (YGC).
BVHP Foundation Substance Abuse Services and AIDS program along with the BVHP Foundation Behavioral Health Program are funded by the City and County of San Francisco.
The Southeast Community Response Network (CRN) receives funding from the Department of Children, Youth, & Their Families (DCYF).
BVHP Foundation Transportation Services is funded by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and the San Francisco County Transportation Authority.
Ohlhoff Recovery Programs
Henry Ohlhoff House
601 Steiner Street,
San Francisco, CA94117
(415) 621-4388x227
www.ohlhoff.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(415) 626-9782x10

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

For over 50 years, Ohlhoff Recovery Programs has provided quality programs for adults and adolescents in recovery from substance abuse and chemical dependency.
All services are offered without regard to race, creed, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, nationality, or relapse history.
Please explore our website for more information about our programs and how we can help.
And please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help keep our programs affordable for those who need them.
Ohlhoff Recovery Programs
San Francisco Outpatient Program
2191 Market Street, Suite A,
San Francisco, CA94114
(415) 575-1100
www.ohlhoff.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(888) 677-4543

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Private health insurance

Specializing in Adolescents, Men

For over 50 years, Ohlhoff Recovery Programs has provided quality programs for adults and adolescents in recovery from substance abuse and chemical dependency.
All services are offered without regard to race, creed, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, nationality, or relapse history.
Please explore our website for more information about our programs and how we can help.
And please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help keep our programs affordable for those who need them.
Horizons Unlimited of
San Francisco Inc
440 Potrero Avenue,
San Francisco, CA94110
(415) 487-6700
www.horizons-sf.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(415) 487-6704, (415) 487-6730

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders

Our Mission

Horizons is a youth development and empowerment organization rooted in community service and advocacy. Culturally competent and linguistically sensitive programs are driven by the needs of our youth and reflect the diversity of the population served. Horizons' primary goal is to engage, educate, and inspire youth.
Target Population

Our target population is primarily high at-risk Latino youth, ages 12 to 26, who reside in the Mission District and throughout the city and county of San Francisco. As these youths develop and mature, they must overcome poverty and its associated symptoms, including: gang affiliation and neighborhood violence, developmental delays, poor academic performance, and arrests and/or detainment that often results in truancy and dropping out of school.

On a daily basis, many of our youth engage in risky behaviors that threaten their well-being and future prospects. Often times, these maladaptive behaviors lead them to place their lives in jeopardy. Other youth don't actively engage in these behaviors, but are passive victims living in dangerous environments.

The target population faces the following types of risk factors:

Community
Easy access to illicit drugs, alcohol, and illegal weapons; low-income areas with high rates of social violence; low attachment to traditional institutions of support; depleted community resources, etc.

Family
Multi-generational involvement in crime, substance abuse, school dropouts, immigrant family reunification issues, poor parenting practices, family conflict, etc.

School
Academic failure due to a lack of attachment to schools, truancy, suspension and expulsion.

Peers
Association with peers who have similar risk behaviors and withdrawal from conventional social norms.
Asian American Recovery Services Inc
6181 Mission Street,
Daly City, CA94014
(415) 337-0140
www.aars.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Languages: Chinese, Tagalog

Over the past quarter century, AARS has served tens of thousands of youth and adults through a variety of education, prevention, and treatment services while garnering national recognition for our culturally competent model programs. Not long after AARS’ inception, we could proudly reflect on our accomplishments within the Asian and Pacific Islander community and also acknowledged the formidable challenges and opportunities of serving other disenfranchised populations. Our programs in San Francisco demonstrated that we needed to expand our reach to impacted communities living in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties as well as providing services to a significant number of clients outside the Asian American community. The result has been the development of a broad range of services to diverse populations, which in turn has strengthen our core belief that culturally competent services make a difference in the lives of individuals and families.
AARS has maintained a healthy and stable financial position and is recognized for its sound strategies. The AARS board of directors and staff has been engaged in strategic planning, revising our plans over the last three years responding to the lingering recession. The current economic recession has severely impacted many community non-profit organizations, and AARS is no exception. We have experienced drastic budget cuts to our federal, state and local contracts resulting in a reduction in staff and services. But our infrastructure and fiscal management remain sound, enabling us to efficiently operate and deliver services to those in need. More importantly, we have never lost sight of our core vision and mission thanks in large part to the competent and dedicated efforts of the AARS staff and management.
In order to continue forward to the next 25 years, we are working diligently to align the agency to the new models of service provisioning and funding due to the passage of the federal Health Care Reform and the Mental Health Parity Acts. While the impacts of these new laws on AARS’ service programs are still being analyzed, one thing is clear – there is now public recognition of the interrelationship between substance abuse, mental health and primary care. Like our founding members, we know that these connections matter to the success of our clients and are glad to know our work and experience position our agency for these coming changes. While future events are unpredictable, we are excited to continue our work in strengthening and building healthier communities.
Asian American Recovery Services Inc
Project RECONNECT
2166 Hayes Street, Suite 302,
San Francisco, CA94117
(415) 776-1001
www.aars.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Chinese

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Criminal justice clients

Over the past quarter century, AARS has served tens of thousands of youth and adults through a variety of education, prevention, and treatment services while garnering national recognition for our culturally competent model programs. Not long after AARS’ inception, we could proudly reflect on our accomplishments within the Asian and Pacific Islander community and also acknowledged the formidable challenges and opportunities of serving other disenfranchised populations. Our programs in San Francisco demonstrated that we needed to expand our reach to impacted communities living in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties as well as providing services to a significant number of clients outside the Asian American community. The result has been the development of a broad range of services to diverse populations, which in turn has strengthen our core belief that culturally competent services make a difference in the lives of individuals and families.
AARS has maintained a healthy and stable financial position and is recognized for its sound strategies. The AARS board of directors and staff has been engaged in strategic planning, revising our plans over the last three years responding to the lingering recession. The current economic recession has severely impacted many community non-profit organizations, and AARS is no exception. We have experienced drastic budget cuts to our federal, state and local contracts resulting in a reduction in staff and services. But our infrastructure and fiscal management remain sound, enabling us to efficiently operate and deliver services to those in need. More importantly, we have never lost sight of our core vision and mission thanks in large part to the competent and dedicated efforts of the AARS staff and management.
In order to continue forward to the next 25 years, we are working diligently to align the agency to the new models of service provisioning and funding due to the passage of the federal Health Care Reform and the Mental Health Parity Acts. While the impacts of these new laws on AARS’ service programs are still being analyzed, one thing is clear – there is now public recognition of the interrelationship between substance abuse, mental health and primary care. Like our founding members, we know that these connections matter to the success of our clients and are glad to know our work and experience position our agency for these coming changes. While future events are unpredictable, we are excited to continue our work in strengthening and building healthier communities.
Lee Woodward Counseling Center for
Women/AARS
2166 Hayes Street, Suite 303,
San Francisco, CA94117
(415) 776-1001
www.aars.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(415) 776-1001x13, (415) 776-1001x11

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Chinese, Korean, Tagalog

Specializing in Women

Over the past quarter century, AARS has served tens of thousands of youth and adults through a variety of education, prevention, and treatment services while garnering national recognition for our culturally competent model programs. Not long after AARS’ inception, we could proudly reflect on our accomplishments within the Asian and Pacific Islander community and also acknowledged the formidable challenges and opportunities of serving other disenfranchised populations. Our programs in San Francisco demonstrated that we needed to expand our reach to impacted communities living in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties as well as providing services to a significant number of clients outside the Asian American community. The result has been the development of a broad range of services to diverse populations, which in turn has strengthen our core belief that culturally competent services make a difference in the lives of individuals and families.
AARS has maintained a healthy and stable financial position and is recognized for its sound strategies. The AARS board of directors and staff has been engaged in strategic planning, revising our plans over the last three years responding to the lingering recession. The current economic recession has severely impacted many community non-profit organizations, and AARS is no exception. We have experienced drastic budget cuts to our federal, state and local contracts resulting in a reduction in staff and services. But our infrastructure and fiscal management remain sound, enabling us to efficiently operate and deliver services to those in need. More importantly, we have never lost sight of our core vision and mission thanks in large part to the competent and dedicated efforts of the AARS staff and management.
In order to continue forward to the next 25 years, we are working diligently to align the agency to the new models of service provisioning and funding due to the passage of the federal Health Care Reform and the Mental Health Parity Acts. While the impacts of these new laws on AARS’ service programs are still being analyzed, one thing is clear – there is now public recognition of the interrelationship between substance abuse, mental health and primary care. Like our founding members, we know that these connections matter to the success of our clients and are glad to know our work and experience position our agency for these coming changes. While future events are unpredictable, we are excited to continue our work in strengthening and building healthier communities.
Project Ninety Inc
Elliott Center
314 Baden Avenue,
South San Francisco, CA94080
(650) 579-7881
www.projectninety.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Residential beds for clients' children, Men

Project Ninety is a human services organization dedicated to meeting the needs of individuals, families and our communities through comprehensive alcohol and drug recovery services.
Values
Project Ninety treats our clients with dignity and respect and is a safe, structured, and compassionate service provider.
Project Ninety views our employees as our greatest resource and provides every opportunity for them to achieve their hopes, goals and career aspirations.
Project Ninety is a leading participant in the communities we serve. We pledge our cooperation, support and assistance while always retaining our independence.
We strive to be exemplary citizens, conducting ourselves in an ethical and honest manner.
Project Ninety constantly strives to deliver a superior return on our funders' investments.
Latino Commission on Alc/DA Services
Casa Quetzal
635 Brunswick Street,
San Francisco, CA94112
(415) 337-4065
www.thelatinocommission.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Halfway house

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Criminal justice clients

The Latino Commission (TLC) was organized and incorporated in early 1991 by concerned community members. The impetus was the common recognition that alcohol and drug abuse problems among Latinos were serious and growing at alarming rates. This was aggravated by the fact that there were numerous barriers preventing Latinos access to the substance abuse treatment system as it was configured at the time. The formation of The Latino Commission was an empowerment initiative for direct community involvement in substance abuse treatment issues.

Today, The Latino Commission operates multiple residential programs, transitional facilities, and outpatient treatment centers. Services are offered in San Francisco, San Mateo, and Tulare Counties. Although TLC's initial focus was to the Latino community, due to its success in reaching communities of color, it is fast becoming one of the leaders in multicultural programming. Assistance is provided to all who "walk through our doors" regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual preference, or age.

The agency currently serves approximately 250 clients annually, with a static capacity of 80 within its residential programs. In the county of Tulare, a minimum of 1,250 families are fed and clothed annually through its pantry and 32 young women, ages 14-17, participate in the pregnancy prevention program.
Jericho Project
154 and 156 2nd Avenue,
Daly City, CA94014
(415) 656-1700
www.jericho-project.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Men

The staff of Jericho Project has determined through professional research and numerous years of personal experience that a structured lifestyle is critical to long-term recovery. We believe that it is essential to provide each individual with a regular schedule of activities designed to promote stable and responsible living. We provide clients with outstanding facilities in which they attend therapy and self-help activities in the evening.



As a state licensed facility, Jericho Project Drug & Alcohol Recovery Program offers a wide variety of facilitated group sessions as well as educational and individual sessions. These sessions include both lecture and group interaction process. Residents are encouraged to examine and personalize recovery concepts presented with an emphasis upon developing a personal program of recovery.



Jericho Project staff also facilitates topic-oriented group sessions that reflect the life issues of those involved. Some of the issues that we address in these group sessions are as follows: breaking denial, acceptance of responsibility for your actions, motivation for change, decisional balance, changing beliefs that block recovery, values clarification, strategies for overcoming anger and rage, and relapse prevention using cue extinction. These are just some of the core issues we address during our groups. We are consistently updating our group discussions to remain current and topical.

Our educational curriculum is a key component of our treatment planning. We believe that it assists the client in developing into a functional, self-reliant individual. The current courses include Mathematics, English, Communication, Health and Wellness, Introduction to Computers, Introduction to Vocational Training, Spanish and Reading and Writing.



The vast majority of Jericho Project clients are court mandated. This does not put them at a disadvantage in treatment. It is important to remember that almost all chemically addicted individuals come into treatment because of circumstances that have forced them to. Noted researcher Terence T. Gorski has concluded that mandated clients often have higher long-term recovery rates than voluntary clients. This is because when the going gets rough and they want to drop out of treatment, they can’t. They have to stay in treatment and work through the tough issues that will allow them to have meaningful and productive lives. A major consideration in the recovery process is that a deep personality change requires time.



The Jericho Project approach to recovery is unique in that we accept no government funding of any kind. This is a huge part of our therapy and promotes responsibility, self-efficacy, and allows them to feel they are an integral part of the community. This is something that our typical client has been sorely missing in their previous lifestyle. We have designed the program as a social model in order to create an environment in which each person is an important member. We have found that this hands on approach, with each member contributing and participating in all aspects of day to day living and treatment is far more effective than any therapeutic alliance between a clinician and patient.



Our typical client would be classified as a chemically dependent criminal offender. The staff of Jericho Project recognizes that most of our clients have lived lives centered around the use of alcohol, drugs, and criminal behaviors. When these self-defeating activities are removed, the basic core organizing activities are taken out of their lives. They must be replaced with something more positive or there will be no long-term recovery. This void is essentially what we assist them in filling. It is imperative that we give them the opportunity to make new and positive social contacts, find hobbies and activities.



Stanton Peele, Ph.D., a psychologist and health care researcher, and a leading figure in the addiction field states in his book “The Truth About Addiction and Recover”, that by drawing on the latest research and case studies you can conclude that developing values, skills, and life resources is what enables people to quit addictions, and to shed the addict identity altogether. Furthermore, he states that you are susceptible to addiction if you lack the staples of existence; the sustenance that life offers people under normal conditions. You are more readily addicted when you lack the social supports of friends and family, inner security and peace of mind, and options for positive social activities and community involvement. That is, you are most at risk for addiction when you do not have the following elements of a satisfying life: family and friends, enjoyable pastimes, a positive environment, a belief in personal value, involvement in community, and a purpose in life. These observations by Dr. Peele are very much in line with what we believe at Jericho Project.



The staff of Jericho Project feels that by following the groundwork that Dr. Peele and Terence Gorski have arrived at with their research, and what we have observed through our experiences, will result in a beneficial outcome for our clients. We work very hard at supplying them with the tools and assistance it takes to achieve this goal. We will support them with anything that will be beneficial to their recovery.


Again, as noted researcher Terence T. Gorski has advocated, the success of a structured recovery program requires a triad of cooperation between the program, client, and Criminal Justice Professionals. It is important to remember that the clients willingness to accept help is usually linked to the problems they are experiencing. When life has you by the short hairs, your mind and heart will follow. But when the pressure is off and life returns to normal, the motivation to change and the willingness to accept help and follow directions often disappears.

This is why it is important to get a commitment to a long-term, structured recovery program. Chemically dependent offenders must be put in a situation where they can be held accountable for participating in recovery program. Any time chemically dependent offenders start to feel better, there motivation tends to disappear and they feel the urge to drop out of treatment. If this happens, there must be a way to create a new motivational crisis. The best way to do this is to make long-term treatment a condition of probation or parole and have definite long-term treatment a condition of probation or parole and have definite legal consequences imposed any time the offender break with their treatment program.



Jericho Project staff will do everything they can to help facilitate the client in this lifestyle change by working together with the Criminal Justice Professionals. For the client, the only requirement we have is that they need to supply the effort, willingness, dedication, and a commitment to live a lifestyle based on rigorous honesty.

Seeking out Help for Drug Addiction

Provided By: 

Seeking out help for drug addiction

n/a

Friday, November 16, 2007

Some of us spend our entire lives chasing an elusive feel-good sensation, whether it comes from drinking, smoking, taking drugs, spending too fast and freely, or overeating.

It’s human nature to want the things that give us pleasure, but what starts out as fun can turn into an ugly spiral into addiction.

“Being able to recognize troubling signs early on can be extremely valuable,” said Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Al Horning.

“Help is available. The professional staff at Interior Health can tell you what help is available and where to get it. You don’t have to hit rock bottom before you can get help; in fact, when it comes to addiction, the earlier you talk to someone, the better.”

Some 600,000 Canadians are addicted to alcohol and another 200,000 are addicted to drugs. Those numbers don’t even begin to show the true extent of the problem, but it is a reason enough to support National Addiction Awareness Week, the national campaign to raise awareness about addictions.

“We see students looking for something to calm their nerves at exam time,” said Joan Campbell, director for Okanagan mental health and addictions services.

“We see stressed out professionals, and we see parents under pressure to make ends meet, raise a family, and live up to responsibilities.

“Teachers, lawyers, doctors, students, homemakers, athletes, young and old, rich and poor, it makes no difference who you are or where you live. Anyone can become dependent.”

At times we all look for an escape from problems at home or work, but Campbell said turning to alcohol and other drugs isn’t the answer.

“Alcohol dependency is by far the most common addiction, but certainly not the only one,” said Campbell.

“That means we have to be constantly alert to any potential problem, and be able to recognize troubling signs.”

Can you spot trouble? Ask yourself these questions:

Do you need a few drinks before going out, or do you sometimes drink more than you intended?

Do you hide your alcohol use from family and friends?

Are you pregnant and still smoking, drinking or taking drugs?

Do you take drugs or drink and drive?

Do you have problems related to eating or sleeping?

Do you sometimes forget what happened while you were drunk or high?

Addiction is so consuming it can fracture relationships with family and friends, jeopardize our jobs, and harm our mental and physical health.

Of...

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