Drug Abuse Treatment Centers North Pole AK

Some of us spend our entire lives chasing an elusive feel-good sensation, whether it comes from drinking, smoking, taking drugs, spending too fast and freely, or overeating. Teachers, lawyers, doctors, students, homemakers, athletes, young and old, rich and poor, it makes no difference who you are or where you live. Anyone can become dependent. Alcohol dependency is by far the most common addiction, but certainly not the only one.

Fairbanks Native Association
Ralph Perdue Center
3100 South Cushman Street, Suite 100,
Fairbanks, AK99701
(907) 452-6251x6411
www.fairbanksnative.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(907) 452-6251x6400

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days), Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Specializing in DUI/DWI offenders

For thousands of years Alaska’s first people, jointly called Alaska Natives, made their livelihood as subsistence hunters and fishers (Alaska’s History: The People, Land and Events of the North Country, 1993). In Alaska’s interior region the subsistence traditions of our ancestors were forever changed by the first successful expedition into the Interior by Lt. Henry Allen in 1885 and the discovery of gold in the Tanana Valley surrounding Fairbanks. The discovery of gold brought thousands of non-Native people to the area and the Alaska Native traditional subsistence lifestyle began to give way to one marked by permanent villages, which today rely in large part on a cash economy.

The increasing reliance of these villages on the cash economy has forced many Alaska Natives to leave their ancestral homelands for Alaska’s urban areas, including Fairbanks, to seek employment. In 1960, only 12% of Alaska Natives lived in urban areas. By 1990 the percent of Alaska Natives living in urban areas increased to 44%. Population changes between 1980 and 1990 reflect the highest rate of Native in-migration to urban centers. In 1990, for instance, 11% of the population of the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area (Alaska’s Interior) migrated to other parts of Alaska (Alaska Department of Labor, 1994).

The experiences of the first Alaska Natives to move to the city of Fairbanks were marked by discrimination. Many Alaska Native men serving in the United States Army during World War II at Ladd Airfield Base near Fairbanks were barred from Fairbanks stores, hotels, restaurants, and bars. At that time “No Indians” signs and attitudes were an integral part of the Alaska Native experience in urban areas.

By the mid-1960s most of the signs had come down, but Alaska Natives continued to find that they were welcome in few public places. “Even people who didn’t drink had no place to go except the bars,” said Poldine Carlo, Athabascan Native Elder and one of FNA’s charter members, when asked why she started FNA. “Because there was nowhere else for them to go, we started inviting people over to our house. For two or three winters, we even had different village mushers and their dogs staying here in the woods behind our house.”

It was these experiences that led Poldine Carlo and others, including her husband Bill and Ralph Perdue, Morris Thompson, Margie Wright, John Sackett, and Max Huhndorf to organize an association for urban Alaska Natives. While the Civil Rights Movement was shaking the nation, Alaska Natives in Fairbanks started meeting around Poldine’s kitchen table to design an association that would bring Alaska Native people living in Fairbanks together; an association that would give them a sense of belonging where there was none; an association that would speak on behalf of Alaska Natives, who had little political clout; and an association that would meet their cultural, social, and economic needs.

In 1967 FNA was incorporated as a nonprofit under the laws of the State of Alaska. Membership then as it is now was open to Alaska Natives and American Indians of one-quarter blood or greater who once a year elect a nine-person board of directors. Today FNA is a powerful and influential Native American voice in Alaska. Over the years our organization has changed public policies that were discriminatory to our people and our programs have helped countless people find new jobs, maintain sobriety, celebrate their culture, and receive an education.

As FNA continues to build a stronger community, we will hold true to our mission “to provide quality services in a professional manner for our membership and the greater Fairbanks community.”

Seeking out Help for Drug Addiction

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Seeking out help for drug addiction

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Friday, November 16, 2007

Some of us spend our entire lives chasing an elusive feel-good sensation, whether it comes from drinking, smoking, taking drugs, spending too fast and freely, or overeating.

It’s human nature to want the things that give us pleasure, but what starts out as fun can turn into an ugly spiral into addiction.

“Being able to recognize troubling signs early on can be extremely valuable,” said Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Al Horning.

“Help is available. The professional staff at Interior Health can tell you what help is available and where to get it. You don’t have to hit rock bottom before you can get help; in fact, when it comes to addiction, the earlier you talk to someone, the better.”

Some 600,000 Canadians are addicted to alcohol and another 200,000 are addicted to drugs. Those numbers don’t even begin to show the true extent of the problem, but it is a reason enough to support National Addiction Awareness Week, the national campaign to raise awareness about addictions.

“We see students looking for something to calm their nerves at exam time,” said Joan Campbell, director for Okanagan mental health and addictions services.

“We see stressed out professionals, and we see parents under pressure to make ends meet, raise a family, and live up to responsibilities.

“Teachers, lawyers, doctors, students, homemakers, athletes, young and old, rich and poor, it makes no difference who you are or where you live. Anyone can become dependent.”

At times we all look for an escape from problems at home or work, but Campbell said turning to alcohol and other drugs isn’t the answer.

“Alcohol dependency is by far the most common addiction, but certainly not the only one,” said Campbell.

“That means we have to be constantly alert to any potential problem, and be able to recognize troubling signs.”

Can you spot trouble? Ask yourself these questions:

Do you need a few drinks before going out, or do you sometimes drink more than you intended?

Do you hide your alcohol use from family and friends?

Are you pregnant and still smoking, drinking or taking drugs?

Do you take drugs or drink and drive?

Do you have problems related to eating or sleeping?

Do you sometimes forget what happened while you were drunk or high?

Addiction is so consuming it can fracture relationships with family and friends, jeopardize our jobs, and harm our mental and physical health.

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