Women's Alcohol Treatment Centers Augusta GA

Because of the way their bodies metabolize alcohol, women become drunk faster; get addicted to alcohol more quickly; and develop alcohol-related diseases such as hypertension and damage to the liver, brain and heart more rapidly than men do, according to Sue Foster, vice president and policy director at the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

Augusta Metro Treatment Center
525 Ellis Street,
Augusta, GA30901
(706) 722-3855
www.methadonetreatment.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Specializing in Pregnant/postpartum women, Women

Colonial Management Group, LP (CMG) is a unique organization of fifty-seven (57) private outpatient substance abuse treatment clinics that have been successfully treating opiate dependence since 1986. The Company, which is headquartered in Orlando, Florida, takes great pride in establishing and maintaining the values, mission, and direction of the organization. We are continuously searching for the most innovative techniques to utilize in our facilities to ensure the most comprehensive treatment experience resulting in the best outcome possible.
Aiken Center
1105 Gregg Highway,
Aiken, SC29801
(803) 649-1900
www.aikencenter.org

Hotline Phone Numbers: (803) 202-7460

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

The Aiken Center's Core Values
Prevention of addictive behaviors is achievable.
Recovery from addiction is achievable.
The success or failure of recovery must be assessed on the basis of individual needs, preferences, strengths and abilities.
The protection of rights of those being served is of paramount importance to the trust that forms the foundation of our relationships.
The positive and negative qualities of family life determine the qualities of the lives of those individuals who make up our families.
The ability to live with self-respect and dignity is critical to achievement of healthier lives and families.
Strengthening families will create a more productive and healthier community.
It is important to seek the input of the persons we serve to ensure that our services meet the needs of the Community.
Collaboration with other human service agencies helps to provide access to needed services in the Community.
The Aiken Center must remain financially and managerially strong so that we can continue to exist and assist those who need our help.
The Aiken County Commission on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services, DBA, The Aiken Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Services, is the public substance abuse service provider for Aiken County, SC. It holds 501 (c) 3 tax exemption status from the Internal Revenue Service. It has been in operation in Aiken County since February 12, 1974—over thirty-five years. Pursuant to SC Act 301 of 1973, it was made a “political component” of Aiken County, SC on January 1, 1980. The Aiken Center is one of thirty-three (33) local, sister substance abuse provider agencies that serve all forty-six (46) counties of SC.
The Aiken Center has been CARF (Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) accredited for behavioral health outpatient and prevention/diversion services for adults as well as behavioral health outpatient and prevention/diversion services for children and adolescents since 1994. It is licensed as an outpatient substance abuse treatment provider by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with Chapter 61-12-20 of the SC Code of Laws, the Aiken Center is the “designated county authority” for the provision of substance abuse services in Aiken County, SC through designation by the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services (DAODAS).
The Aiken Center functions as an independent entity under contracts with a variety of funding sources, including Aiken County, DAODAS, South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (Medicaid) and a variety of third-party payers. It has been a member agency of the United Way of Aiken County since 1981. It has a current annual budget of $1.7 million dollars. It serves 1,600 clients per year with 22,000 hours of direct treatment/intervention service by a staff of 30 members.
Hope House Inc
2205 Highland Avenue,
Augusta, GA30904
(706) 737-9879
www.hopehouseforwomen.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(706) 733-3463

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Persons with HIV/AIDS, Gays and Lesbians, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Residential beds for clients' children

The mission of Hope House Inc. is to apply a holistic approach to treatment in a long-term residential setting in order to break the cycle of chemical dependency for women, their dependent children, and their families.

The Addiction Risks for Women in Recovery

Provided By: 

'You can't teach them hope' women face greater addiction risks, less promise of recovery

Mary Meehan

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Treating female alcoholics or drug addicts often requires unraveling the damage of physical and mental abuse that began long before the first drink or drug.

"When you are dealing with women who are addicted, it''s typical to see issues of sexual abuse, lack of education, poverty, lack of parenting skills, the presence of children," said Barbara Ramlow, director of the targeted assessment program at the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky.

Women coming into treatment often have untreated closed-head injuries from domestic violence, or debilitating depression made worse by drugs or alcohol. Some suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, the same cluster of symptoms -- anxiety, nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty sleeping and a feeling of detachment -- that afflicts many soldiers returning from war zones.

One study showed that 70 percent of alcoholic women seeking treatment had experienced some kind of sexual abuse. (That compares with about 12 percent of men.) Many had suffered trauma as a child or teenager, including high rates of incest.

Others end up in dangerous situations because of their drug or alcohol abuse.

A woman using illegal drugs is "a good target for a predator," said T.K. Logan, a researcher with the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at UK. "They know that you are either not going to report it or you are not going to be believed."

The result of all this trauma can be "a woman broken into pieces," Ramlow said.

''Overwhelmed and immobilized''

Those pieces don''t magically mend just because someone puts down the drink or the drug. In some cases, the withdrawal of the substance can cause all of those old psychological wounds to begin to fester anew. And those issues, Ramlow said, have implications as to how much a person is able to recover. The grief and trauma can come on like a wave, and then "it''s easy to become overwhelmed and immobilized," she said.

Because of the way their bodies metabolize alcohol, women become drunk faster; get addicted to alcohol more quickly; and develop alcohol-related diseases such as hypertension and damage to the liver, brain and heart more rapidly than men do, according to Sue Foster, vice president and policy director at the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

Women are also 48 percent more likely than men to have drugs prescribed that can lead to addiction, and twice as likely as men to become addicted to those drugs, according to Women Under the Influence, a book published by the center in 2006.

Historically, Foster said, addiction treatment was created based on the male experience. The standard 30-day inpatient treatment model was originally based on work with male heroin addicts, and it often relies on confrontational group meetings that d...

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