Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) Laconia NH

It is widely understood that about 1 in 10 people have the disease of alcoholism. That 10% of the population includes all races, creeds, ages, sexes, religions, and all other factors. Alcoholism does not discriminate any of these; it simple exists when the individual has the threefold illness.

Lakes Region General Hospital
Nathan Brody Chemical Dependency Prog
73 Daniel Webster Highway,
Belmont, NH3220
(603) 527-2908

Intake Phone Numbers:
(603) 527-2980

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE), Access to Recovery

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders

Nestled in the beautiful Lakes and Three Rivers Regions of New Hampshire, LRGHealthcare is a not-for-profit healthcare charitable trust representing Lakes Region General Hospital (LRGH), Franklin Regional Hospital (FRH), 22 affiliated medical providers and service programs.
Our mission is to provide quality, compassionate care and to strengthen the well-being of our community. We are driven by healthcare needs of the communities we serve, and very proud of our long tradition of providing quality healthcare services to the Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.
About LRGHealthcareLRGH is a community and regional acute care facility with a licensed bed capacity of 137 beds, and FRH is a 25-bed critical access community hospital. In 2000, FRH and LRGH merged together and added the trade name LRGHealthcare. Committed to increasing our capacity for patients, adding more depth in staffing, and more options for patients, we knew that joining our hospitals would provide stability to both organizations, ultimately benefiting the communities we serve.
The Lakes Region communities we serve include, Laconia, Gilford, Alton, Ashland, Barnstead, Belmont, Center Harbor, Gilmanton, Meredith, Moultonborough, New Hampton and Sandwich. In the Three Rivers Region, we serve the communities of Franklin, Tilton, Northfield, Sanbornton, Alexandria, Andover, Bristol, Bridgewater, Boscawen, Danbury, Hebron, Hill and Salisbury.
We offer a wide range of medical, surgical, specialty, diagnostic, and therapeutic services, wellness education, support groups, and other community outreach services. Our Emergency Services department is staffed with specially trained physicians, nurses and staff, providing the highest quality care, delivered with the care and compassion. 24-hour availability of state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, and both ground and air transfer capability to tertiary care facilities. More than 200 active staff physicians and providers are in our network.
Together, LRGH, FRH, and all of our affiliated programs and services provide comprehensive healthcare to the entire Lakes and Three Rivers Regions.

The Truth about Alcoholism and Alcoholics Anonymous

Provided By: 

The Truth about Alcoholism and Alcoholics Anonymous

Cindy Weir

Friday, September 14, 2007 I have read many articles on the subject of alcoholism and AA. Most are full of misinformation, misunderstanding and untruth. This is my attempt, as a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, to help you understand this cunning, baffling and powerful disease and how AA helps us live sober, one day at a time.

The disease of alcoholism, (yes, it's a disease), is a threefold illness- physical, mental and spiritual. There is no cure for alcoholism. What we have is recovery and discovery. It is not a program of self-improvement of self-help. It is a program of self-discovery.

It is widely understood that about 1 in 10 people have the disease of alcoholism. That 10% of the population includes all races, creeds, ages, sexes, religions, and all other factors. Alcoholism does not discriminate any of these; it simple exists when the individual has the threefold illness.

The first aspect of the disease is physical. An alcoholic processes alcohol differently than the "normal" drinker. Of course the term normal includes all ranges of drinkers. But only the alcoholic develops what is known as the phenomenon of craving. In essence, an alcoholic is allergic to alcohol. This allergy manifests itself in this craving making it impossible for us to stop drinking. It is the FIRST drink that gets us drunk, not the last. When one drink is ingested it sets off this phenomenon of craving and makes us want more and more and more. We do not stop until we pass out, black out, go to jail, experience many consequences, and/or die.

The mental obsession is the second aspect of the disease of alcoholism. This obsession crowds out all other thoughts, including the reminders of all the pain, heartache, injury or other consequence that we have experienced. The disease of alcoholism centers in the mind. Therefore, the mind of the alcoholic cannot differentiate between the true and the false. We have just as much a thinking problem as we do a drinking problem.

If these two aspects sound grim, that is because they are what leads us to the desperation, futility and hopelessness that we feel while we are in the throes of the disease. We are either drinking, or we are thinking about drinking. Either way, we have no positive results.

This leads us to the third aspect of alcoholism- the spiritual. An alcoholic must experience an entire psychic change to overcome the physical and mental parts of our disease. There is a "black hole" that we feel and all we know to do is fill it with alcohol. Yet alcohol is only a symptom, our temporary solution to help us not have to feel. We self-medicate, and once we put any form of alcohol, including some in pill form, we set off this allergy/phenomenon of craving and we are gone. And, when we are not drinking, all we can do is obsess over the next drink- when and how we're going to get it. It is a vicious, never-ending cycle which leaves t...

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