Alcoholism Treatment Center Arkadelphia AR

Alcoholism may appear after the first drink, many years of drinking, or after a period of binge drinking. If a person's culture is alcohol free, obviously the genetic influence will not cause alcoholism.

Quapaw House Inc
(870) 246-7636
401 Crittenden Street
Arkadelphia, AR

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BCD Hoover Center
(501) 663-4774
4000 West 13th Street
Little Rock, AR

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Carol Cogell, NCC, NCCC
Saratoga, AR

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Crowleys Ridge Development Council
(870) 932-0228
6009 CW Post Road
Jonesboro, AR

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Turner, Angie
(501) 952-0494
900 S Shackleford Rd Suite 300
Little Rock, AR

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Quapaw House Inc
(501) 767-4456
812 Mountain Pine Road
Hot Springs National Park, AR

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Williams, Mary
(479) 575-0529
221 N. East Avenue
Fayetteville, AR

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William Wilson NCC, MAC, NCGC
(501) 753-1616 
North Little Rock, AR

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Ozark Counseling Services Inc
(870) 449-5177
319 Highway 14 South
Yellville, AR

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Miller, Richard
(501) 580-2308
1215 Breckenridge
Little Rock, AR

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What Causes Alcoholism?

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What Causes Alcoholism?

Philip Sicks

Friday, September 14, 2007 What causes alcoholism? Alcoholism is a disease caused in part by genetics, in part by culture, and in part by personal choice.

Several twin studies have looked at the different alcoholism rate between twins using a group of identical twins and a group of fraternal twins. If alcoholism were only a behavior learned in the home, a set of identical twins should have the same rate of alcoholism as a set of fraternal twins. In fact, if one identical twin is an alcoholic the odds that the other will be also is higher than the odds for fraternal twins. Because identical twins have the same set of genes, and fraternal twins do not, there must be something in the genes themselves that increases the chances of becoming an alcoholic. (Crabbe, J.C., & Harris, R.A., eds. The Genetic Basis of Alcohol and Drug Actions. New York: Plenum Press, 1991.)

Culture also plays a part. Alcoholism may appear after the first drink, many years of drinking, or after a period of binge drinking. If a person's culture is alcohol free, obviously the genetic influence will not cause alcoholism. If the culture only approves of light drinking and occasional drinking, the rate of alcoholism will be lower than a culture that encourages alcohol use. (American Psychologist, 39, 1337-1351, 1984. Reprinted in W.R. Miller (Ed.), Alcoholism: Theory, research, and treatment, Lexington, MA: Gunn, 1985.)

Personal choice also plays a role. Som...

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